Tag Archives: religion

Advanced Certificate Program on Religion and the Rule of Law at Oxford

Honored to be serving on the International Academic Advisory Board of this exciting new Program.

‘The need for a global program to identify and educate the rising generation of scholars and leaders in the field of law and religion: Legal restrictions on religious individuals and groups remain high or very high in many countries of the world, and these official obstacles are often combined with social hostilities regarding religion that are increasing around the world. Sometimes these problems rise to the level of persecution of religious minorities, or even genocide, but more frequent are problems that arise from discrimination, social marginalization, and the ordinary problems of lawmaking, enforcement, adjudication, and regulation.’

Source, and more information about the Program:

http://oxford.iclrs.org

Apply here:

http://oxford.iclrs.org/submit-application/

See also:

Redactioneel ‘Religie en de rule of law’

Paper Presentation during Journal of Law, Religion & State International Conference on ‘The Rule of Law – Religious Perspectives’, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan, Israel, 20-22 November 2016

International Conference on “The Rule of Law with Chinese Characteristics in Transition”

On Islam (Volume six of the Abraham Kuyper Collected Works in Public Theology series)

At the beginning of the twentieth century, famed theologian Abraham Kuyper toured the Mediterranean world and encountered Islam for the first time.

Part travelogue, part cultural critique, On Islam presents a European imperialist seeing firsthand the damage colonialism had caused and the value of a religion he had never truly understood. Here, Kuyper’s doctrine of common grace shines as he displays a nuanced and respectful understanding of the Muslim world. Though an ardent Calvinist, Kuyper still knew that God’s grace is expressed to unbelievers. Kuyper saw Islam as a culture and religion with much to offer the West, but also as a threat to the gospel of Jesus Christ. Here he expresses a balanced view of early twentieth-century Islam that demands attention from the majority world today as well. Essays by prominent scholars bookend the volume, showing the relevance of these teachings in our time.’

Source, and (order) information:

https://www.lexhampress.com/products/138756/on-islam?utm_source=abrahamkuyper.com&utm_medium=button&utm_campaign=lexhampress2015q4&ssi=0

 

Abraham Kuyper’s conviction that religion constitutes the ‘marrow’ of each culture, motivated him to pay frequent attention to the role of Islam, among other things, in the different countries he visited on his journey around the Mediterranean Sea. Similarly, comparative scholars of law and religion should be willing also to investigate the way transcendent perspectives have potentially shaped, and in many cases may well continue to influence, the particular legal systems they study. Public theology of the kind contained in this book can inspire and inform them on their way.

See also:

Book Launch and Panel Discussion: Abraham Kuyper’s Perspective on Islam

Article ‘Princeton Seminary Reforms Its Views on Honoring Tim Keller’

Lemma on the Kuyper cabinet (1901-1905)

Upcoming Speaking Engagement: Annual Conference of the European Academy of Religion, Bologna, March 5-8, 2018

I will be speaking on the topic of ‘Comparative Constitutional Law and Natural Law.’

The abstract reads as follows:

During the last decade or so the discipline of comparative constitutional law has experienced phenomenal growth. Handbooks in the field have become truly global in outlook.

With the globalization of comparative constitutional law, the question arises which standards should be applied to evaluate different legal arrangements? Alternatively, the field would alter into an empirical discipline that merely registers how such mechanisms differ around the globe.

In a not so distant past, it would still have made sense to use religion as a source of inspiration to evaluate different constitutional arrangements. Using faith is not an option anymore, however, as most political orders are rooted in religious cultures. Within the West, moreover, constitutionalism is increasingly separated from religion.

In the proposed paper, following the work of Santiago Legarre among others, I will suggest that the idea of natural law is a serious candidate to serve as a normative framework.

For more information on the program of the conference, see: https://www.europeanacademyofreligion.org/program

‘The European Academy of Religion (EuARe) is a research initiative launched under the high patronage of the European Parliament which offers an exchange platform to academies and scientific societies; associations; research centers and institutions; university labs, clusters, and departments; journals, publishers, media and scholars coming from Europe and the surrounding regions.’

See also:

Podcast of the Law and Religious Freedom Book Panel at the Annual Meetings of the American Academy of Religion and the Society of Biblical Literature in Boston, MA

Press Release: ‘Twelve ILS seed money grants for frontier research at Leiden Law School’

Paper presentation during XXI World Congress of the International Association for the History of Religions

Video Recording of Panel ‘Religion and Pluralism in a Changing World’

‘The recordings of the 24th Annual International Law and Religion Symposium, Religion and Religious FreeDom in a Changing World, held in October of 2017 are now available to view here. (…)’

You can find the link to the video recording of the panel on ‘religion and pluralism in a changing world’ here:  https://www.iclrs.org/event.php/2017+Annual+Symposium/Media/English/3959

‘Religion and Pluralism in a Changing World

Full recording
Jane Wise – Moderator Associate Director, International Center for Law and Religion Studies, J. Reuben Clark Law School, Brigham Young University
John Carpay President, Justice Centre for Constitutional Freedoms
Daniel Cere Professor, School of Religious Studies, McGill University
Hans-Martien ten Napel Professor, Leiden Law School, Institute of Public Law’

See also:

Paper presentation during panel on ‘Religion & Pluralism in a Changing World’, BYU Law School, Provo, Utah

Upcoming Speaking Engagement: 24th Annual International Law and Religion Symposium, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, 1-4 October 2017

Nieuwsbericht ‘Hans-Martien ten Napel neemt deel aan boekpanel over recht en godsdienstvrijheid tijdens jaarvergadering van de American Academy of Religion in Boston, MA’

Paper presentation during panel on ‘Religion & Pluralism in a Changing World’, BYU Law School, Provo, Utah

From October 1-3, 2017, the 24th Annual International Law and Religion Symposium was held at Brigham Young University Law School in Provo, Utah, USA. The Symposium was attended by 100 participants, from 50 different countries, while interpretation at the venue was available in 11 languages (Arabic, French, Italian, Korean, Laotian, Mongolian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Ukrainian, and Vietnamese).

During the Symposium I had the honor of presenting a paper during the panel on ‘Religion & Pluralism in a Changing World’, and to find my recent book on Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom. To Be Fully Human exhibited on the book table.

During the final session of the Symposium my book was generously presented by Prof. Brett G. Scharffs, Director of the International Center for Law and Religion Studies, as one of several new ‘Books of Note’.

Before the official start of the conference, delegates attended a session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Salt Lake City, and heard the Mormon Tabernacle Choir perform their weekly broadcast Music and the Spoken Word.

See for more information about the Symposium:

Upcoming Speaking Engagement: 24th Annual International Law and Religion Symposium, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, 1-4 October 2017

See also:

Twelve posts introducing my new book on Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom. To Be Fully Human

Press Release: ‘Hans-Martien ten Napel has book published “Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom. To Be Fully Human”’

Visit Amazon’s Hans-Martien ten Napel Page

Upcoming Speaking Engagement: 24th Annual International Law and Religion Symposium, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, 1-4 October 2017

 

‘The International Center for Law and Religion Studies (ICLRS) is honored to announce the distinguished keynote speaker for the 24th Annual International Law and Religion Symposium — “Religion and Religious Freedom in a Changing World” — to be held 1-4 October 2017 at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah. András Sajó, Hungarian scholar and former Judge of the European Court of Human Rights, and Ján Figeľ, the European Commission’s Special Envoy for promotion of freedom of religion or belief outside the European Union, will speak at the opening session of the Symposium, to be held on Sunday evening, October 1, in the Moot Court Room (303) of the J. Reuben Clark Law School.

The opening session will be streamed live, beginning at 7 pm MST (UTC-7), to listeners worldwide. Interpretation at the venue will be available in 11 languages: Arabic, French, Italian, Korean, Laotian, Mongolian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Ukrainian, and Vietnamese.

Please note that, due to space limitations, the Symposium is open to invited participants only. However, all plenary sessions and other sessions held in Room 303 JRCB will be streamed live, and audio and video recordings of other sessions will be available soon after the event on the Center’s website and on YouTube.  (See recordings from Symposium 2016 here.)’

Source, and more information:

Symposium 2017: “Religion and Religious Freedom in a Changing World”

See also:

Press Release: ‘Hans-Martien ten Napel has book published “Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom. To Be Fully Human”’

Public Lecture by Professor Brett Scharffs on ‘Why Religious Freedom’, April 7, 15.00h, Free University, Amsterdam

Article ‘This Map Of The State Of Religious Freedom Around The World Is Chilling’

 

Book review: ‘The Political Theology of European Integration,’ by Mark R. Royce

‘The central question political scientist Mark R. Royce addresses in his book, The Political Theology of European Integration: Comparing the Influence of Religious Histories on European Policies, is whether the process of European integration as it has developed since the Second World War, and continues to develop as a result of issues such as Brexit, is also influenced by political theological considerations. He defines “political theology” as “the authoritative application of sacred ideas to public policies and discourses” (p. 1). In the context of Royce’s study, which focuses on 17 Western European countries, in particular Roman Catholicism and the Lutheran, Calvinist, and Anglican forms of Protestantism are relevant.’

Read the whole book review, published on the Religion & Liberty Transatlantic Blog, here:   https://acton.org/publications/transatlantic/2017/08/18/book-review-political-theology-european-integration-mark-r

Participant, Acton University, June 20-23 2017, Grand Rapids, Michigan (II)

Just five of the speakers, making this such a very worthwhile event to attend:
– Russell Moore, President of the Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention
– Daniel Mark, Chairman of the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom (USCIRF)
– Carrie Gress, author of the The Marian Option (2017) and Public Intellectual
– Elizabeth Bruenig, Editor at The Washington Post, essayist on religion and politics
– Michael Wear, author of Reclaiming Hope: Lessons Learned in the Obama White House About the Future of Faith in America (2017)

See also: Participant, Acton University, June 20-23 2017, Grand Rapids, Michigan (I).

Bernie Sanders, Tim Farron, and the regime change which has taken place within liberalism

In my new book on Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom. To Be Fully Human (Routledge, 2017), I note how partly under the influence of the social and cultural revolution of the 1960s, liberalism has arguably developed from a means of managing diversity in the direction of an ideological agenda of its own. Illustrative of this development is that for some scholars it has now become a question mark if, and to what extent, religion should be tolerated at all within a liberal democracy.

For more information on the book, go here:

Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom. To Be Fully Human.

See also:

Press Release: ‘Hans-Martien ten Napel has book published “Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom. To Be Fully Human”’.

 

 

Book Recommendations (I): Nicholas Wolterstorff, Understanding Liberal Democracy (2012)

About the book:

Understanding Liberal Democracy presents notable work by Nicholas Wolterstorff at the intersection between political philosophy and religion. Alongside his influential earlier essays, it includes nine new essays in which Wolterstorff develops original lines of argument and stakes out novel positions regarding the nature of liberal democracy, human rights, and political authority. Taken together, these positions are an attractive alternative to the so-called public reason liberalism defended by thinkers such as John Rawls. The volume will be of interest to philosophers, political theorists, and theologians, engaging a wide audience of those interested in how best to understand the nature of liberal democracy and its relation to religion.’

About the author:

‘Nicholas Wolterstorff is Noah Porter Professor Emeritus of Philosophical Theology, Yale University. Currently he is a Senior Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture, at the University of Virginia. He has been President of the American Philosophical Association, and of the Society of Christian Philosophers; he is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Among the lectures he has given are the Wilde Lectures at Oxford University, the Gifford Lectures at St Andrews University, and the Stone Lectures at Princeton Seminary. He has published over twenty books including On Universals, Works and Worlds of Art, Art in Action, Until Justice and Peace Embrace, Reason within the Bounds of Religion, Divine Discourse, John Locke and the Ethics of Belief, Thomas Reid and the Story of Epistemology, Educating for Shalom, Lament for a Son, Justice: Rights and Wrongs and Justice in Love.’

Source, and more information: Wolterstorff, Understanding Liberal Democracy. Essays in Political Philosophy.

As I write in the introduction to my new book, Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom. To Be Fully Human (Routledge, 2017), I have found that some of the most worthwhile books on liberal democracy which have been published in recent years, have been authored, for example, by ethicists and philosophers. You can read part of the introduction to my book here.

As I demonstrate in the third chapter of Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom. To Be Fully Human, Wolterstorff’s Understanding Liberal Democracy is a major example of such a worthwhile book.

See also Twelve posts introducing my new book on Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom. To Be Fully Human