Participant, Acton University, June 20-23 2017, Grand Rapids, Michigan (II)

Just five of the speakers, making this such a very worthwhile event to attend:
– Russell Moore, President of the Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention
– Daniel Mark, Chairman of the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom (USCIRF)
– Carrie Gress, author of the The Marian Option (2017) and Public Intellectual
– Elizabeth Bruenig, Editor at The Washington Post, essayist on religion and politics
– Michael Wear, author of Reclaiming Hope: Lessons Learned in the Obama White House About the Future of Faith in America (2017)

See also: Participant, Acton University, June 20-23 2017, Grand Rapids, Michigan (I).

Upcoming Speaking Engagement, Conference ‘Christianity and the Future of our Societies’, Leuven, Belgium, 15-19 August 2016

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‘The event is jointly organized by the Evangelische Theologische Faculteit, Leuven and the Association for Reformational Philosophy and tackles issues facing the future of our societies. The focus of the conference is to analyze philosophically and theologically what Christianity can contribute to the well-being and flourishing of societies, and people within societies, in the 21st century, in very diverse contexts around the world. The aim of the conference is to discuss with scholars from all over the world not only the significance of religion and Christianity in general, but also the contribution of Christian theology and Christian philosophical thinking in particular for contemporary societies in very different contexts around the globe.’

The paper I will be presenting during the conference is provisionally entitled: ‘Christianity and the Future of Religious Freedom’.

On the Association of Reformational Philosophy:

‘The Association of Reformational Philosophy (ARP) has its roots in the 16th century Reformation and its direct origin in the 19th neo-Calvinist revival (in which Abraham Kuyper was a pivotal figure). One of the goals of the ARP is “to contribute to the deepening of philosophical insight in created reality, and to make these insights fruitful for academic studies and for society”. Key founding fathers of the movement were the Dutch philosophers Herman Dooyeweerd and Dirk Vollenhoven. The movement has grown, and is today globally engaged in academic dialogue between Christianity and the contemporary world, and its animating intellectual, political and economic ideas and leaders. It does so in the expectation that Christianity has important and timely insights to offer.’

On the Evangelische Theologische Faculteit:

‘The Evangelische Theologische Faculteit (ETF) in Leuven, Belgium, has developed into an important European education and research center for Christian theology that seeks relevance to the contemporary world and its concerns. In ETF’s international master’s and doctoral program, students and professors from a wide variety of cultural and denominational backgrounds come from all over the world to engage in stimulating dialogue.’

For more information, and registration, see http://www.cfs2016.org/.

Participant, Conference on Religion and Power: New Directions in Social Ethics, Princeton University (March 12 & 13, 2015)

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‘Questions about power, justice, and the role of religion in social protest remain as vital as ever. This conference provides a timely occasion to address important practical and methodological issues in the field of social ethics. By bringing theorists and practitioners together, we hope to spark fresh conversations about the ways that the actions and relationships of ordinary citizens relate to various social structures, practices, and expressions of power.’

Speakers included:

Ernesto Cortés, Jr., the Industrial Areas Foundation (IAF) co-director and executive director of the West / Southwest IAF regional network; and

Luke Bretherton, Professor of Theological Ethics at Duke Divinity School and author of Resurrecting Democracy. Faith, Citizenship, and the Politics of a Common Life (2014).

For the full conference schedule, see:

http://religion.princeton.edu/religionandpower/conference-schedule/.

Participant, The Ninth Annual John F. Scarpa Conference on ‘Catholic Legal Theory: Aspirations, Challenges, and Hopes’, Villanova University School of Law (2015)

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‘The Ninth Annual John F. Scarpa Conference on Law, Politics, and Culture will explore the topic “Catholic Legal Theory: Aspirations, Challenges, and Hopes.” The symposium will take place on Friday, April 24, from 9:15 a.m. to 4:15 p.m., in Room 201 of the Law School. This program is approved by the Pennsylvania Continuing Legal Education Board for 5 CLE credits (4 substantive, 1 ethics). (…)

CONFERENCE AGENDA

Welcome and Introduction: 9:15 a.m.

Patrick McKinley Brennan, Professor of Law and John F. Scarpa Chair in Catholic Legal Studies, Villanova University School of Law

Session 1: 9:30-10:45 a.m.

Robert Vischer, Dean and Mengler Chair in Law, University of St. Thomas School of Law: “How Should Catholic Legal Theory Matter to Catholic Legal Eduction in a Time of Retrenchment?”

John Breen, Professor of Law, Loyola University Chicago School of Law: “Catholic Legal Theory in Catholic Law Schools: Past and Present”

Elizabeth Schiltz, Professor, Thomas J. Abood Research Scholar, and Co-Director of the Terrence J. Murphy Institute for Catholic Thought, Law and Public Policy, University of St. Thomas School of Law: “‘You Talkin’ to Me?’ Who Are We Talking to? And Why Should They Listen to Us?”

Break

Session 2: 11:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

Michael A. Scaperlanda, Professor of Law and Gene and Elaine Edwards Family Chair in Law, The University of Oklahoma College of Law: “Challenging the Common Assumptions regarding Liberty”

Michael Moreland, Vice Dean and Professor of Law, Villanova University School of Law: “Pope Francis and the Project of Catholic Legal Theory”

Patrick McKinley Brennan: “Problematics of Catholic Legal Theory under the Roman Regime of Novelty (since 1965 or so)”

Lunch

Session 3: 1:15-2:45 p.m.

Thomas C. Berg, James L. Oberstar Professor of Law and Public Policy, University of St. Thomas School of Law: “The Relevance and Irrelevance of the Reformation to the Catholic Legal Theory Project”

Marc O. DeGirolami, Associate Professor of Law & Associate Dean for Faculty Scholarship, St. John’s University School of Law: “Tradition and Catholic Legal Theory”

Susan Stabile, Professor of Law and Faculty Fellow for Spiritual Life, University of St. Thomas School of Law: “Evangelii Gaudium and Catholic Legal Theory”

Kevin C. Walsh, Associate Professor of Law, University of Richmond School of Law: “Marius Victorinus at MOJ”

Break

Roundtable: 3:00-4:15 p.m.
The Catholic Legal Theory Project: Concepts and Goals

The annual Conference on Law, Politics, and Culture is named for John F. Scarpa, in recognition of his generous support of Villanova University School of Law through the John F. Scarpa Chair in Catholic Legal Studies.’

Source: https://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/law/newsroom/webstories/2015/0325.html.

About Villanova University:

‘Villanova University is a Roman Catholic institution of higher learning founded by the Order of Saint Augustine in 1842. Villanova provides a comprehensive education rooted in the liberal arts; a shared commitment to the Augustinian ideals of truth, unity and love; and a community dedicated to service to others.’

Presentation during Second National Conference of Christians in Political Science, Calvin College, Grand Rapids, MI (1999)

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About the Conference:

‘The Paul Henry Institute will host the second national conference of Christians in Political Science, June 17-20, 1999. Christian political scientists from the United States, Canada, the Netherlands, and Australia have already registered to attend the event. More than twenty different panels, each addressing different thematic issues, have been organized, with more than sixty papers being given by different scholars in the field. On Friday, June 18, the Rev. Richard John Neuhaus will deliver an address that will be open to the public.’

Source: http://henry.calvin.edu/dotAsset/182cb684-4848-4d40-8150-9476e78b335d.pdf.

About the Henry Institute:

‘The Paul B. Henry Institute for the Study of Christianity and Politics was created in 1997 to continue the work of integrating Christian faith and politics advanced by its namesake, educator and public servant Paul B. Henry.

The Institute is dedicated to providing resources for scholarship, encouraging citizen involvement and education, structuring opportunities to disseminate scholarly work, seeking avenues to communicate and promote information about Christianity and public life to the broader public, and motivating and training future scholars and leaders.’

About Christians in Political Science:

‘Christians in Political Science aims to encourage students of politics to integrate their Christian faith into their research and writing; stimulate and assist members to bring insights and perspectives from their faith to classroom teaching; and provide a forum for fellowship. We recognize that Christians of good faith may disagree about how Christianity should inform our professional, political, and other activities. Indeed, a major goal of CPS is to encourage discussion of these matters among believers from different traditions and with divergent views.’

My own presentation was entitled ‘The Fall of Christian Democracy in Europe’.

Chapter in volume on Religion, Politics and Law. Philosophical Reflections on the Sources of Normative Order in Society (2009)

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‘Modern, liberal democracies in the West living under the rule of law and protection of human rights cannot articulate the very values from which they derive their legitimacy. These pre-political and pre-legal preconditions cannot be guaranteed, let alone be enforced by the state, but constitute nevertheless its moral and spiritual infrastructure. Until recently, a common background and horizon consisted in Christianity, but due to secularisation and globalisation, society has become increasingly multicultural and multireligious. The question can and should be raised how religion relates to these sources of normative order in society, how religion, politics and law relate to each other, and how social cohesion can be attained in society, given the growing varieties of religious experiences. In this book, a philosophical account of this question is carried out, on the one hand historically from Plato to the Enlightenment, on the other hand systematically and practically.’

My own chapter, co-authored with Florian H. Karim Theissen, is entitled ‘Taking Pluralism Seriously: The US and the EU as Multicultural Democracies’.

See https://www.researchgate.net/publication/228283908_Taking_Pluralism_Seriously_The_US_and_the_EU_as_Multicultural_Democracies.

For order information, visit http://www.brill.com/religion-politics-and-law;

or http://www.amazon.com/Religion-Politics-Law-Bart-Labuschagne/dp/9004172076/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1452689366&sr=8-1&keywords=religion%2C+politics%2C+law+labuschagne.