Workshop Law and Religion

Date
26 June 2017
Time
10:00 – 12:00  hrs.
Address
Kamerlingh Onnes Building
Steenschuur 25
2311 ES Leiden
Room
A014

On June 26th, a small workshop on comparative law & religion will take place with Dr. Jaclyn Neo (National University of Singapore, Law School). Jaclyn is a very well-published scholar in the field of comparative public law and human rights, particularly in the field of law and religion (see bio below). She studied at Yale Law School (LLM, JSD) and she is an Assistant Professor of Public Law at the National University of Singapore. She is an innovative thinker and a wonderful speaker. On June 26, Jaclyn will present one of her most recent papers and engage with  her audience’s questions. Hans-Martien Ten Napel will act as discussant and Sofia Fernandes Da Silva Ranchordás will chair the workshop. Both colleagues and students are welcome!

You can register for the workshop by sending an email to Sofia, preferably by June 10. Should you be interested in presenting a recent paper, pitching your PhD research or discussing a new research idea on law and religion or freedom of expression so as to receive some feedback from an expert in this field, please let Sofia know. Due to time constraints, only 2-3 additional presentations can be accepted.

Source: https://www.universiteitleiden.nl/en/events/2017/06/workshop-law-and-religion.

See also:

International Conference on “The Rule of Law with Chinese Characteristics in Transition”;

Blogpost ‘Religious Freedom, Eastern Ethical Monism, and Western “Civic Totalism”‘.

Participant, expert seminar ‘Religious Pluralism and Human Rights in Europe: Where to Draw the Line?’, Netherlands Institute of Human Rights, Utrecht (9-10 May 2006)

REBO-website-SIM_01

‘”How should we deal with religious pluralism in contemporary Europe from a human rights perspective and where should we draw the line, if any?” This was the central question of an expert seminar held in 2006 at Utrecht University to celebrate the inaugural address of Abdullahi An-Na’im, who occupied the G.J. Wiarda Chair at the Netherlands Institute of Human Rights (SIM) in 2005/2006. (…)
Though religious pluralism in itself is anything but new in Europe, the influx of large groups of non-Christians, especially Muslims, and the political climate after recent terrorist attacks have profoundly changed the terms of the debate on how to deal with it. Should all religions be treated the same, or is it legitimate to take European Christian heritage into account?
Does religion deserve more protection than culture? What does it mean if we say the State has to be secular and/or neutral? How should freedom of religion be dealt with if it conflicts with other fundamental rights such as sex equality? And how should one approach limitations on the freedom of expression that are related to religion, such as hate speech bans or criminalisation of glorifying terrorism?
The questions are set against the background of modern notions of citizenship and the European human rights framework.’

Source: http://intersentia.com/en/shop/academisch/religious-pluralism-and-human-rights-in-europe.html.

About the Netherlands Institute of Human Rights:

‘SIM is the key centre of expertise of human rights research and education at Utrecht University.

The Netherlands Institute of Human Rights offers internationally oriented study programmes, conducts interdisciplinary research and organises a range of activities in the field of human rights.

History
Established in 1981 as a research support institute for a group of Dutch human rights NGOs, SIM has become integrated into Utrecht University over time. SIM was one of the founders of the Netherlands School of Human Rights Research and is the home of the Netherlands Quarterly of Human Rights. Famous human rights researchers have headed SIM since its creation, including Hans Thoolen, Manfred Nowak, Peter Baehr, Cees Flinterman and Jenny Goldschmidt. Antoine Buyse is SIM’s current director. With a rich tradition and a keen eye voor current and future developments in the field of human rights, SIM is a leading academic research institute and the home base of a vibrant, interdisciplinary and international group of researchers, lecturers, and PhD students.’

– See more at: http://sim.rebo.uu.nl/en/over-ons/#sthash.Klf2stYo.dpuf.

Respondent, The Atlantic Conversations on Religion and Public Life, St. George’s House, Windsor Castle (2007)

St. George's House

From the ‘Welcome to St. George’s House’:

‘This event is hosted by St George’s House in association with the Center of Theological Inquiry, Princeton. Our aim is to bring together a distinguished group of public leaders and scholars from the United Kingdom, the Netherlands and the United States of America to foster a trans-Atlantic dialogue on vital questions.

Our theme is topical, complex and challenging. We shall examine, for example:

– whether religion should enjoy any acknowledged role in the public sphere in a modern, pluralist democracy, or be confined to private observance;

– the potential conflict between deep-rooted tradition, tolerance of multi-cultural diversity, and freedom of expression and practice;

– whether the concepts of neutrality and even-handedness have any meaning when the State – any State – needs ethical and moral underpinning for its public values.

Many other important questions will certainly arise in debate. You are attending, not a formal Conference, but a Conversation. As always at St George’s House, all are encouraged – irrespective of any public role or responsibility – to think and speak freely and imaginatively and to be open to new ideas, secure in the knowledge that confidentiality is guaranteed. I hope that original, stimulating and potentially influential insights will emerge – and that the historic and beautiful environment of Windsor Castle will exert on you its special magic and ensure lasting happy memories of your stay.

Andrew Carter

Warden

St. George’s House.’

For the full programme, see:

https://www.secularism.org.uk/uploads/354684dc5b129a3305694252.pdf.