Participant, Acton University, June 20-23 2017, Grand Rapids, Michigan (II)

Just five of the speakers, making this such a very worthwhile event to attend:
– Russell Moore, President of the Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention
– Daniel Mark, Chairman of the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom (USCIRF)
– Carrie Gress, author of the The Marian Option (2017) and Public Intellectual
– Elizabeth Bruenig, Editor at The Washington Post, essayist on religion and politics
– Michael Wear, author of Reclaiming Hope: Lessons Learned in the Obama White House About the Future of Faith in America (2017)

See also: Participant, Acton University, June 20-23 2017, Grand Rapids, Michigan (I).

Press Release: ‘Twelve ILS seed money grants for frontier research at Leiden Law School’

‘Twelve researchers of our Law School have been awarded an ILS seed money grant. This grant enables researchers to create space for preparing a grant proposal for NWO, ERC or otherwise.

Given the impressive quality of the twelve applications received in response to the ILS seed money call, the Research Board advised to find ways to support all the applications. The Faculty Board has invested additional funds to make this possible. Each researcher that has received a grant has committed her- or himself to submitting a grant proposal and to publish at least one article on the research theme.

An overview of the grant writers and their research themes is provided in the table below. (…)

For more information on the research focus area Interaction between Legal Systems visit our website.

Applicant Research theme
Boom, W.H. van Litigation strategy and third party funder involvement
De Brabandere, E. The dynamics of arbitration institutions in investment treaty arbitration
Cuyvers, A. Beyond Brexit: New models of EU membership for a flexible and viable Union of 27
Dam-de Jong D.A. From war to peace: the contribution of international law to enhancing compliance with intra-state peace agreements
Jesse, M. Who ‘we’ really are and who ‘we’ want to be – Europe’s Reaction to the Refugee Crises: the envisioned project will look at legislative changes after the refugee crises to decipher underlying ideals and principles governing our societies
Kunst, M.J.J. Unlocking the international evidence base of “victim-oriented” legislation: A systematic and critical review of the literature
Leijten, I. Social rights cities
Liefaard, T. Access to justice for children: Understanding the concept and its significance for the effective protection of children’s rights in a pluralist world
Napel, H.M.T.D. ten Constitutional identity in a ‘Post-Truth, Post-West, Post-Order’ Era.
Ouwerkerk, J. What price EU defence rights? Exploring the need for a different division of costs in EU criminal justice cooperation
Rose, C.E. How transnational criminal law treaties influence the behaviour of states, in particular those treaties concerning corruption, organised crime, and terrorist financing
Sentse, M. Sociale netwerken binnen detentie: Correlaties en consequenties van de aard en mate van sociale contacten tussen gedetineerden

Source: Twelve ILS seed money grants for frontier research at Leiden Law School

Participant, Acton University, June 20-23 2017, Grand Rapids, Michigan (I)

Source: CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=240138

This week I will be attending the 2017 Acton University Conference, at DeVos Place, Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Acton University ‘is a unique, four-day exploration of the intellectual foundations of a free society. Guided by a distinguished, international faculty, Acton University is an opportunity to deepen your knowledge and integrate philosophy, theology, business, development – with sound, market based, economics.’

It is organized by the Acton Institute, ‘a think-tank whose mission is to promote a free and virtuous society characterized by individual liberty and sustained by religious principles’.

Topics dealt with include:

Thomas Jefferson v. Alexander Hamilton

The Inspiration of the Declaration: What Calvin Coolidge’s Views on Government and Faith Tell Us Today

John Locke’s Philosophy of Liberalism

Edmund Burke and the Origins of Modern Conservatism

Alexis de Tocqueville: Does Liberty Follow from Democracy?

Democracy and Development

Natural Law and Human Flourishing

“Post-Consensus” Culture and Natural Law

Religious Liberty: The Dawn of the First Amendment

The Religious Problem with Religious Freedom

Marriage and Religious Liberty

How to Understand and Critique Secularism

Presenters will be, among others:

Ryan Anderson, Ph.D., William E. Simon Senior Research Fellow in American Principles and Public Policy, The Heritage Foundation

Hunter Baker, J.D., Ph.D., University Fellow and Associate Professor of Political Science, Union University

The Honorable Judge Janice Rogers Brown, Circuit Judge, U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit

Lenore Ealy, Ph.D., President, The Philanthropic Enterprise, Inc.

Kenneth Grasso, Ph.D., Professor and Chair of Political Science, Texas State University

Carrie Gress, Ph.D., Author and Public Intellectual

Robert Joustra, Ph.D., Director of the Centre for Christian Scholarship, Redeemer University College

Daniel Mark, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science, Villanova University, and Chairman of the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom (USCIRF)

Russell Moore, President of the Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention

Svetlana Papazov, D.Min., Lead Pastor, Real Life Church; CEO & Founder, Real Life Center for Entrepreneurial and Leadership Excellence

John Pinheiro, Ph.D., Professor of History and Founding Director of Catholic Studies, Aquinas College

Amity Shlaes, Presidential Scholar, The King’s College.

Sources, and more informationActon UniversityActon Institute.

See alsoUpcoming Speaking Engagement: Symposium The Federalist Papers, Brussel, 20 april 2017

Bernie Sanders, Tim Farron, and the regime change which has taken place within liberalism

In my new book on Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom. To Be Fully Human (Routledge, 2017), I note how partly under the influence of the social and cultural revolution of the 1960s, liberalism has arguably developed from a means of managing diversity in the direction of an ideological agenda of its own. Illustrative of this development is that for certain scholars it has now become a question mark if, and to what extent, religion should be tolerated at all within a liberal democracy.

For more information on the book, go here:

Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom. To Be Fully Human.

See also:

Press Release: ‘Hans-Martien ten Napel has book published “Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom. To Be Fully Human”’.

 

 

Book Recommendations (I): Nicholas Wolterstorff, Understanding Liberal Democracy (2012)

About the book:

Understanding Liberal Democracy presents notable work by Nicholas Wolterstorff at the intersection between political philosophy and religion. Alongside his influential earlier essays, it includes nine new essays in which Wolterstorff develops original lines of argument and stakes out novel positions regarding the nature of liberal democracy, human rights, and political authority. Taken together, these positions are an attractive alternative to the so-called public reason liberalism defended by thinkers such as John Rawls. The volume will be of interest to philosophers, political theorists, and theologians, engaging a wide audience of those interested in how best to understand the nature of liberal democracy and its relation to religion.’

About the author:

‘Nicholas Wolterstorff is Noah Porter Professor Emeritus of Philosophical Theology, Yale University. Currently he is a Senior Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture, at the University of Virginia. He has been President of the American Philosophical Association, and of the Society of Christian Philosophers; he is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Among the lectures he has given are the Wilde Lectures at Oxford University, the Gifford Lectures at St Andrews University, and the Stone Lectures at Princeton Seminary. He has published over twenty books including On Universals, Works and Worlds of Art, Art in Action, Until Justice and Peace Embrace, Reason within the Bounds of Religion, Divine Discourse, John Locke and the Ethics of Belief, Thomas Reid and the Story of Epistemology, Educating for Shalom, Lament for a Son, Justice: Rights and Wrongs and Justice in Love.’

Source, and more information: Wolterstorff, Understanding Liberal Democracy. Essays in Political Philosophy.

As I write in the introduction to my new book, Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom. To Be Fully Human (Routledge, 2017), I have found that some of the most worthwhile books on liberal democracy which have been published in recent years, have been authored, for example, by ethicists and philosophers. You can read part of the introduction to my book here.

As I demonstrate in the third chapter of Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom. To Be Fully Human, Wolterstorff’s Understanding Liberal Democracy is a major example of such a worthwhile book.

See also Twelve posts introducing my new book on Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom. To Be Fully Human

Twelve posts introducing my new book on Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom. To Be Fully Human

For the posts, please see:

Article ‘This Map Of The State Of Religious Freedom Around The World Is Chilling’

Article ‘Princeton Seminary Reforms Its Views on Honoring Tim Keller’

Yale Law Professor: ‘American courts are tackling Islamophobia – why won’t Europeans?’

Waarom de PVV niet het initiatief in de kabinetsformatie moet krijgen

New Book: ‘The Benedict Option: A Strategy for Christians in a Post-Christian Nation’ (2017)

R.R. Reno on ‘Islam and America’

Michael Wear’s Reclaiming Hope (2017): ‘Learn How the Seeds of the Trump Presidency Were Sown in the Obama White House’

Major New Report by the National Secular Society: Rethinking Religion and Belief in Public Life

Symposium on Christian Democracy and America: ‘Can Christian Democracy Be America’s Next European Import?’

Journalist Ben Judah, Author of This is London (2016): ‘I Found Faith Everywhere’

The Washington Post on Why Religious Freedom Could Become the Major Religion Story of 2017

Book on Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom. To Be Fully Human (Routledge) now available for pre-order

Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom. To Be Fully Human now also available as eBook

See:

eBook (VitalSource)

Kindle (Amazon)

Table of Contents

Introduction

1. In Medias Res: Communal Religious Freedom under Pressure

2. Social Pluralist Constitutionalism

3. Pluriform Democracy

4. A Generous Conception of Religious Freedom

Conclusion: “A Horizon of Beauty”

Press Release: ‘Hans-Martien ten Napel has book published “Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom. To Be Fully Human”’

’18 May 2017

In 2014 Hans-Martien ten Napel received a Research Fellowship in Legal Studies at the Center of Theological Inquiry in Princeton, NJ. The book he wrote as a result of this fellowship was published last week by Routledge Law.

The description of the book, entitled Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom. To Be Fully Human, is as follows:

‘In both Europe and North America it can be argued that the associational and institutional dimensions of the right to freedom of religion or belief are increasingly coming under pressure. This book demonstrates why a more classical understanding of the idea of a liberal democracy can allow for greater respect for the right to freedom of religion or belief.

The book examines the major direction in which liberal democracy has developed over the last fifty years and contends that this is not the most legitimate type of liberal democracy for religiously divided societies. Drawing on theoretical developments in the field of transnational constitutionalism, Hans-Martien ten Napel argues that redirecting the concept and practice of liberal democracy toward the more classical notion of limited, constitutional government, with a considerable degree of autonomy for civil society organizations would allow greater religious pluralism. The book shows how, in a postsecular and multicultural context, modern sources of constitutionalism and democracy, supplemented by premodern, transcendental legitimation, continue to provide the best means of legitimating Western constitutional and political orders.’

Research Fellowship in Legal Studies Hans Martien ten Napel

More information about the book

Interview in 2015 with Hans-Martien ten Napel about the research project

Source: https://www.universiteitleiden.nl/en/news/2017/05/hans-martien-ten-napel-published-book-constitutionalism-democracy-and-religious-freedom.-to-be-fully-human

For the Dutch version of the press release, please see: Hans-Martien ten Napel publiceert boek “Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom. To Be Fully Human”

Book on Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom. To Be Fully Human now published

About the book:

‘In both Europe and North America it can be argued that the associational and institutional dimensions of the right to freedom of religion or belief are increasingly coming under pressure. This book demonstrates why a more classical understanding of the idea of a liberal democracy can allow for greater respect for the right to freedom of religion or belief.

The book examines the major direction in which liberal democracy has developed over the last fifty years and contends that this is not the most legitimate type of liberal democracy for religiously divided societies. Drawing on theoretical developments in the field of transnational constitutionalism, Hans-Martien ten Napel argues that redirecting the concept and practice of liberal democracy toward the more classical notion of limited, constitutional government, with a considerable degree of autonomy for civil society organizations would allow greater religious pluralism. The book shows how, in a postsecular and multicultural context, modern sources of constitutionalism and democracy, supplemented by premodern, transcendental legitimation, continue to provide the best means of legitimating Western constitutional and political orders.’

For the source, and more information also on how to order the book, see: Routledge.com or Amazon.com.

See also: Interview on project on ‘Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom’.

Expertisecentrum Politieke Legitimiteit

‘Het Expertisecentrum Politieke Legitimiteit is per 2017 in het leven geroepen om het aanbod van onderzoeksthema’s en -vaardigheden van wetenschappers uit Leiden en Den Haag beter te laten aansluiten bij de vraag vanuit overheden, maatschappelijke instanties en bedrijven. Het centrum biedt bemiddeling en begeleiding bij het uitvoeren van vraaggestuurd (contract)onderzoek naar politieke legitimiteit in theorie en praktijk, in binnen- en buitenland.

De Universiteit Leiden heeft op vier faculteiten (waarvan drie in Leiden en één in Den Haag) een indrukwekkende expertise in huis op het gebied van ‘politieke legitimiteit’. Onze onderzoekers houden zich bijvoorbeeld bezig met internationale conflictoplossing, de positie van veiligheidsdiensten, democratische vernieuwing, de toekomst van politieke partijen, de legitimiteit van de rechterlijke macht, enzovoort.

Deze onderzoekers zijn sinds 2010 samengebracht binnen het profileringsgebied Politieke Legitimiteit, waarin de Universiteit Leiden hen heeft gestimuleerd om vernieuwend, vaak multi- en interdisciplinair onderzoek te doen. Het actieve netwerk dat hiervan het resultaat is, en dat zich over de vier faculteiten uitstrekt, heeft per 2017 een expertisecentrum voortgebracht.

Het Expertisecentrum

Het Expertisecentrum Politieke Legitimiteit heeft als doel om de maatschappelijke vraag naar wetenschappelijk onderzoek in kaart te brengen en actief vraaggericht onderzoek op te zetten, in samenwerking met enerzijds de onderzoekers en anderzijds maatschappelijke en overheidsinstanties die behoefte hebben aan nieuw onderzoek naar (onderwerpen gelieerd aan) politieke legitimiteit. Het expertisecentrum bemiddelt in het opstellen van aanvragen en onderzoeksopdrachten om de samenwerking tussen opdrachtgever en uitvoerende onderzoeker(s) te vergemakkelijken. De coördinatie van het centrum is in handen van prof. dr. Wim Voermans (Staats- en Bestuursrecht) en dr. Geerten Waling (Politieke Wetenschap).

Meer informatie

Download onze brochure (pdf) voor een uitgebreide toelichting en voorbeelden. Voor meer informatie: g.h.waling@fsw.leidenuniv.nl.’

Bron: https://www.universiteitleiden.nl/research-focus-areas/politieke-legitimiteit/expertisecentrum-politieke-legitimiteit.