Monthly Archives: January 2019

Nieuwe aflevering Tijdschrift voor Religie, Recht en Beleid (2018/3)

Deze nieuwe aflevering van het Tijdschrift voor Religie, Recht en Beleid bevat, naast een redactioneel van mijn hand naar aanleiding van het boek Ongelofelijk van Yvonne Zonderop, onder meer een actuele beschouwing van Adriaan Overbeeke (VU/Universiteit Antwerpen) over mensenrechtelijke aspecten van het voornemen van de regering om buitenlandse financiering van geloofsgemeenschappen te belemmeren.

Zie: https://www.bjutijdschriften.nl/tijdschrift/religierechtenbeleid/2018/3.

Zie voorts:

Redactioneel ‘Religie en de rule of law’

Redactioneel, ‘Hoe kan het democratisch ethos worden bevorderd?’

Member, Editorial Board, Journal for Religion, Law and Policy

 

 

Article ‘Institutional Religious Freedom in Review’

Grateful to Dr. Stanley Carlson-Thies, the Founder and Senior Director of the Institutional Religious Freedom Alliance (IRFA), for generously including my recent book on Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom, To Be Fully Human in this review of recent books on institutional religious freedom.

The whole review is worth reading, here follows just the passage on my book:

‘To find or create those better principles and practices, engaged citizens—emphatically including policymakers and government executives—should carefully study Hans-Martien ten Napel’s Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom: To Be Fully Human. Here is a treatment of religious freedom and public policy that breaks free of the American predisposition to regard our society’s architecture as comprised only of individuals, government, and business, neglecting churches, faith-based organizations and the many other components of civil society, and that goes beyond our propensity to deal with diverse convictions mainly by (often very reluctantly) conceding exemptions to laws otherwise considered to justifiably demand uniformity.

Ten Napel, who teaches at Leiden University, is rooted in the Dutch Calvinist tradition–think Abraham Kuyper—and this gives him a deeply and affirmatively pluralist approach to the protection of religion and conscience in public policy. He is, further, a frequent participant in religious freedom conferences and research initiatives in the United States. This means that he writes into our less-thoroughly-pluralist framework, helping to illuminate shortcomings and to be able to suggest a more capacious framework and a broader set of tools and principles. Unusually for a discussion of these weighty topics, Ten Napel references throughout the book how engagement in those various conferences and research initiatives has led him to develop his thinking about government and diversity. Rather than being off-putting, though, this thread helps to make what are complex discussions more accessible to the reader.

Ten Napel’s book is illuminating precisely because he begins by accepting the fact of deep differences of worldview, both in concepts and in practices, and by assuming as the default for public policy the accommodation of diversity, rather than a striving for uniformity. This means giving full value to non-religious, along with religious, reasons not to go along with the public consensus and generally accepted laws. Also, especially, fully to accept that civil society—nonprofits, houses of worship, companies—is a major component of our lives and not to be ignored in considering how to achieve a unity that respects diversity. Remember: while government presses toward uniformity and acts by compulsion, civil society is the place for orderly, structured, institutionalized diversity achieved by voluntary, rather than coerced, action. In civil society, with its diverse options that accommodate varying preferences in employment, the provision of services and choices of products, you will find a school that fits your values even as I find one that matches mine. Diversity is here more readily accommodated than in the I win-you lose pattern that is the default of government action (although pluralist devices can make government rules more protective of diversity).

Achieving Os Guinness’s “civil public square” needs not only a strong commitment to freedom of conscience and religion coupled with an agreement of each to act for the good of all. It also needs specific pluralistic tools and principles and methodologies, going beyond general constitutional maxims and the tool of religious exemptions. Study Hans-Martien ten Napel’s Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom and John Inazu’s Confident Pluralism to understand the vital role of civil society and pluralist government policies and practices in making it possible for us to live together as civic neighbors with, and not only despite, our deep differences.’

Source:

Institutional Religious Freedom In Review

See also:

Upcoming Paperback Release

 

Upcoming Paperback Release

Pleased to announce that the editorial board of Routledge have decided to publish my book Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom. To Be Fully Human (2017) in paperback. They anticipate publication in March 2019.

Preview PDF here: https://www.taylorfrancis.com/books/9781317236917?fbclid=IwAR0aiJiTnvOvWAv57HCS1vkwLAiNNTp1BU96knPp-GC4MGxh5P6DB82JzWw

A Media Review Copy Request Form for my book is available here: https://pages.email.taylorandfrancis.com/review-copy-request

For some earlier reviews of the book, see:

“Liberalism’s got problems. On this, most of us can agree. Hans-Martien ten Napel’s newest book is no exception to that emerging consensus. Ten Napel’s book is part of the zeitgeist of new sensational works on the crisis of liberalism, James K.A. Smith’s Awaiting the King and Patrick Deneen’s Why Liberalism Failed, which argue that we have hit ‘peak liberalism.’ Happily, ten Napel seems far less pessimistic, though. Rather, as Charles Taylor would describe his own work in A Secular Age, it is a kind of loyal opposition to constitutional liberalism: not a revolutionary attempt to dispose of it, but an effort to alert us to the resources inside liberalism’s own often forgotten or marginalized canon, especially religious ones, that may enlarge its virtues and minimize its vices.” Robert Joustra, Review of Faith & International Affairs (https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15570274.2018.1469823?journalCode=rfia20&).

“To sum up, the book Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom: To Be Fully Human is a well-written text on such important issues for contemporary societies as freedom of religion or belief in its communal form, freedom of conscience, and civic activity. It attempts to show an integral approach to the human being. This integral approach should strive to create such an ethos in which a full development of the human being is possible. By a full development is meant such a condition in which this being can manifest his or her beliefs not only within the privacy of his or her home but also in public without any fear of oppression or discrimination. If citizens are forced to hide their religious views, they are doomed to be inauthentic selves, and will always feel a kind of schizophrenia.” Prof. Jan Klos Hab. Ph.D., Journal of Markets and Morality (https://www.marketsandmorality.com/index.php/mandm/article/view/1331).

“Ten Napel heeft al met al een heel fraai boek opgeleverd. Het is vooral ook een boek dat het verdient breder gelezen te worden dan binnen de kringen van de internationale constitutionele rechtswetenschap. Juist ook voor het Nederlandse publieke debat vormt dit boek nadrukkelijk een theoretische versterking tegenover al te secularistische (en daarmee potentieel zelfondermijnende) benaderingen van democratie, rechtsstaat en religieuze vrijheid. Er staat, kortom, veel op het spel met deze thematiek. Niets minder dan To be fully human.'” R.J. (Robert) van Putten MSc MA, Radix. Tijdschrift over geloof, wetenschap en samenleving. https://www.forumc.nl/radix/recente-nummers/773-radix-nummer-2-2019 (https://www.forumc.nl/radix/recente-nummers/773-radix-nummer-2-2019).

“Ten Napel’s book is illuminating precisely because he begins by accepting the fact of deep differences of worldview, both in concepts and in practices, and by assuming as the default for public policy the accommodation of diversity, rather than a striving for uniformity. This means giving full value to non-religious, along with religious, reasons not to go along with the public consensus and generally accepted laws. Also, especially, fully to accept that civil society–nonprofits, houses of worship, companies–is a major component of our lives and not to be ignored in considering how to achieve a unity that respects diversity.” Dr. Stanley Carlson-Thies (http://www.irfalliance.org/institutional-religious-freedom-in-review/).

Author profile:

https://www.routledge.com/authors/i18338-hans-martien-ten-napel

Overwegende… Yvonne Zonderop en de wetenschappelijke kakafonie van opvattingen (III)

Voor de binnenkort verschijnende, derde aflevering van het Tijdschrift voor Religie, Recht en Beleid van 2018 schreef ik een Overwegende onder bovenstaande titel. In drie achtereenvolgende blogposten valt de voorlaatste versie van dit redactioneel hier alvast te lezen. Hieronder deel 3.

Wanneer we kijken naar de staatsrechtsbeoefening in de Verenigde Staten, maar bijvoorbeeld ook in Nederland, dan is de LAPA-methode daar veruit dominant. Veel wetenschappers lijken het hanteren van een vast referentiepunt als achterhaald te beschouwen. Ook het idee dat aan de universiteit gestreefd zou moeten worden naar waarheidsvinding, een notie die centraal stond bij de oprichting van veel van de meest toonaangevende instellingen van hoger onderwijs, ervaren velen inmiddels als problematisch. Natuurlijk wordt er nog wel naar theorievorming gestreefd, maar bij gebrek aan een vast referentiepunt, kan deze theorie alle kanten uitgaan. De kakafonie van opvattingen die hieruit voortvloeit, is eerder kenmerkend voor de hedendaagse universiteit dan de ambitie om de ‘waarheid’ te achterhalen. Ik zou niet durven beweren dat deze kakafonie van meningen niet ook haar charmes heeft, zoals ik ook de LAPA-seminars kon waarderen. Een op voorhand uitsluiten van de door het James Madison Program voorgestane werkwijze leidt echter tot wetenschappelijke eenzijdigheid, die op gespannen voet staat met het karakter van een universiteit.

Het zou de moeite waard zijn om te onderzoeken of en, zo ja, in hoeverre er een relatie bestaat tussen de voorkeur voor wetenschapsbeoefening zonder een vast referentiepunt en de door Zonderop beschreven teloorgang van het christelijk geloof in ons land. Wie immers niet meer wekelijks in de kerk vertrouwd wordt gemaakt met het hanteren van een vast referentiepunt bij reflectie op de vragen van deze tijd, zal allicht ook eerder oriëntatie op een vaststaand wetenschappelijk kader afwijzen. Wat de uitkomst van dergelijk onderzoek ook zou kunnen zijn, voor nu volstaat de constatering dat de gesignaleerde eenzijdigheid in de wijze van wetenschapsbeoefening zich gelijktijdig lijkt voor te doen als de afbrokkeling van de christelijke cultuur waarvoor Ongelofelijk waarschuwt.

Einde

Zie voorts:

Overwegende… Yvonne Zonderop en de wetenschappelijke kakafonie van opvattingen (II)

Overwegende… Yvonne Zonderop en de wetenschappelijke kakafonie van opvattingen (I)

Member, Editorial Board, Journal for Religion, Law and Policy