Tag Archives: religious liberty

Chapter on ‘The Boundaries of Faith-Based Organizations in Europe’ in forthcoming Research Handbook on Law and Religion

The description of the edited volume reads as follows:

‘Offering an interdisciplinary, international and philosophical perspective, this comprehensive Handbook explores both perennial and recent legal issues that concern the modern state and its interaction with religious communities and individuals.

Providing in-depth, original analysis the book includes studies of a wide array of nation-states, such as India and Turkey, which each have their own complex issues centred on law, religion and the interactions between the two. Longstanding issues of religious liberty are explored such as the right of conscientious objection, religious confession privilege and the wearing of religious apparel. The contested meanings of the secular state and religious neutrality are revisited from different perspectives and the reality of the international human rights protections for religious freedom are analysed.

Timely and astute, this discerning Handbook will be a valuable resource for both academics and researchers interested in the many topics surrounding law and religion. Lawyers and practitioners will also appreciate the clarity with which the rights of religious liberty, and the challenges in making these compatible with state law, are presented.’

The Research Handbook, to be published with Edward Elgar in September 2018, is edited by Rex Ahdar, Faculty of Law, University of Otago, New Zealand.

My own chapter is entitled: ‘The Boundaries of Faith-Based Organizations in Europe.’

Other contributors to the volume include: R. Albert, B.L. Berger, J.E. Buckingham, P. Dane, J. Harrison, M.A. Helfand, M. Hill, A. Koppelman, I. Leigh, J. Neo, Y. Rosnai, R. Sandberg, S.D. Smith, K. Thompson and F. Venter.

See for the full table of contents, and order information:

https://www.e-elgar.com/shop/research-handbook-on-law-and-religion.

See also:

Paper presentation during XXI World Congress of the International Association for the History of Religions

New volume on ‘Religion and Civil Society: The Changing Faces of Religion and Secularity’

NWO to finance research project ‘Religion Renegotiated: Faith-Based Organizations and the State in the Netherlands since the 1960s’

 

Participant, Acton University, June 20-23 2017, Grand Rapids, Michigan (II)

Just five of the speakers, making this such a very worthwhile event to attend:
– Russell Moore, President of the Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention
– Daniel Mark, Chairman of the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom (USCIRF)
– Carrie Gress, author of the The Marian Option (2017) and Public Intellectual
– Elizabeth Bruenig, Editor at The Washington Post, essayist on religion and politics
– Michael Wear, author of Reclaiming Hope: Lessons Learned in the Obama White House About the Future of Faith in America (2017)

See also: Participant, Acton University, June 20-23 2017, Grand Rapids, Michigan (I).

Participant, Acton University, June 20-23 2017, Grand Rapids, Michigan (I)

Source: CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=240138

This week I will be attending the 2017 Acton University Conference, at DeVos Place, Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Acton University ‘is a unique, four-day exploration of the intellectual foundations of a free society. Guided by a distinguished, international faculty, Acton University is an opportunity to deepen your knowledge and integrate philosophy, theology, business, development – with sound, market based, economics.’

It is organized by the Acton Institute, ‘a think-tank whose mission is to promote a free and virtuous society characterized by individual liberty and sustained by religious principles’.

Topics dealt with include:

Thomas Jefferson v. Alexander Hamilton

The Inspiration of the Declaration: What Calvin Coolidge’s Views on Government and Faith Tell Us Today

John Locke’s Philosophy of Liberalism

Edmund Burke and the Origins of Modern Conservatism

Alexis de Tocqueville: Does Liberty Follow from Democracy?

Democracy and Development

Natural Law and Human Flourishing

“Post-Consensus” Culture and Natural Law

Religious Liberty: The Dawn of the First Amendment

The Religious Problem with Religious Freedom

Marriage and Religious Liberty

How to Understand and Critique Secularism

Presenters will be, among others:

Ryan Anderson, Ph.D., William E. Simon Senior Research Fellow in American Principles and Public Policy, The Heritage Foundation

Hunter Baker, J.D., Ph.D., University Fellow and Associate Professor of Political Science, Union University

The Honorable Judge Janice Rogers Brown, Circuit Judge, U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit

Lenore Ealy, Ph.D., President, The Philanthropic Enterprise, Inc.

Kenneth Grasso, Ph.D., Professor and Chair of Political Science, Texas State University

Carrie Gress, Ph.D., Author and Public Intellectual

Robert Joustra, Ph.D., Director of the Centre for Christian Scholarship, Redeemer University College

Daniel Mark, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science, Villanova University, and Chairman of the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom (USCIRF)

Russell Moore, President of the Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention

Svetlana Papazov, D.Min., Lead Pastor, Real Life Church; CEO & Founder, Real Life Center for Entrepreneurial and Leadership Excellence

John Pinheiro, Ph.D., Professor of History and Founding Director of Catholic Studies, Aquinas College

Amity Shlaes, Presidential Scholar, The King’s College.

Sources, and more informationActon UniversityActon Institute.

See alsoUpcoming Speaking Engagement: Symposium The Federalist Papers, Brussel, 20 april 2017

Contribution to volume on Reshaping Protestantism in a Global Context (2009)

0706-1

‘The regional contributions from Africa and Asia show how the old European made denominational differences fade in the light of African Instituted Churches or Pentecostalism. Reshaping Protestantism is not a backward oriented project of reconstructing the original but makes use of the inner protestant pluralism to cope with globalization and changing religious landscapes. Who reads through the different articles can only come to the conclusion: Yes, there is a contribution to be expected from mainline Protestantism in all its variety.’

My own contribution to the volume is entitled ‘Protestantism, Globalization, and the Democratic Constitutional State’. You can download it here:

https://openaccess.leidenuniv.nl/handle/1887/15162.

The abstract reads as follows:

‘In this article I want to explore whether Calvinism has the potential to once again act as a force toward cultural liberty in today’s world, and if so, to what extent. Because religion is of profound importance to one’s identity, I will thereby focus on religious liberty. In paragraph two I will, first of all, indicate what the pluralist approach to constitutional democracy is about, that neo-Calvinists have developed during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Paragraphs three and four will then look at the prospects for this approach in the Netherlands, where it originated, and in other cultural contexts, respectively. I will round up with a conclusion in which I will refer to Alister E. McGrath’s thesis about the end of mainline Protestantism.

 

Order information of the volume as a whole:

http://www.lit-verlag.de/isbn/3-8258-0706-1;

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=Reshaping+Protestantism+in+a+Global+Context.