Tag Archives: religious communities

Chapter on ‘The Boundaries of Faith-Based Organizations in Europe’ in forthcoming Research Handbook on Law and Religion

The description of the edited volume reads as follows:

‘Offering an interdisciplinary, international and philosophical perspective, this comprehensive Handbook explores both perennial and recent legal issues that concern the modern state and its interaction with religious communities and individuals.

Providing in-depth, original analysis the book includes studies of a wide array of nation-states, such as India and Turkey, which each have their own complex issues centred on law, religion and the interactions between the two. Longstanding issues of religious liberty are explored such as the right of conscientious objection, religious confession privilege and the wearing of religious apparel. The contested meanings of the secular state and religious neutrality are revisited from different perspectives and the reality of the international human rights protections for religious freedom are analysed.

Timely and astute, this discerning Handbook will be a valuable resource for both academics and researchers interested in the many topics surrounding law and religion. Lawyers and practitioners will also appreciate the clarity with which the rights of religious liberty, and the challenges in making these compatible with state law, are presented.’

The Research Handbook, to be published with Edward Elgar in September 2018, is edited by Rex Ahdar, Faculty of Law, University of Otago, New Zealand.

My own chapter is entitled: ‘The Boundaries of Faith-Based Organizations in Europe.’

Other contributors to the volume include: R. Albert, B.L. Berger, J.E. Buckingham, P. Dane, J. Harrison, M.A. Helfand, M. Hill, A. Koppelman, I. Leigh, J. Neo, Y. Rosnai, R. Sandberg, S.D. Smith, K. Thompson and F. Venter.

See for the full table of contents, and order information:

https://www.e-elgar.com/shop/research-handbook-on-law-and-religion.

See also:

Paper presentation during XXI World Congress of the International Association for the History of Religions

New volume on ‘Religion and Civil Society: The Changing Faces of Religion and Secularity’

NWO to finance research project ‘Religion Renegotiated: Faith-Based Organizations and the State in the Netherlands since the 1960s’

 

Commentator, Conference on ‘Religion, Rights, and Institutions’, Princeton University (2014)

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‘The Conference on Religions, Rights, and Institutions will focus on how institutional design, of both religions and political regimes, affects the relationship between religious practice and activity and human rights. It will examine how the internal organization (formal and informal structures and rules) of religions and religious communities affect therights of members of religious communities and the functioning of religion as a source of human rights. It will investigate the scope of, and limits upon, a just state’s authority to compel changes in the internal aspects of organized religion in the name of human rights. Among the questions it will ask is how do social and political institutions shape religious behavior and affect the human rights of members of religious communities and the society at large.

The conference is co-sponsored by Princeton University’s Program in Law and Public Affairs and the Israel Democracy Institute. It will take place on November 23-24, 2014. Attendance is by invitation only.’

My contribution took place during Session 8 (‘Secular Carve-outs in a Religious World; Religious Carve-outs in a Secular World’. Check out the full conference schedule here:

https://lapa.princeton.edu/content/religions-rights-and-institutions.

Chapter in volume on Law and Religion in the 21st Century. Relations between States and Religious Communities (2010)

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‘This book brings together leading international scholars of law and religion to provide an overview of current issues in State-religion relations. The first part of the collection offers a picture of recent developments in key countries and regions. The second part is focused on Europe and, in particular, on the Nordic States and the post-communist countries where State-religion systems have undergone most profound change. The third and final part is devoted to four issues that are currently debated all over the world: the relations between freedom of expression and freedom of religion; proselytism and the right to change religion; the religious symbols; and the legal status of Islam in Europe and Canada.
The work will be a valuable resource for academics, students and policy-makers with an interest in the interaction between law and religion.’

My own chapter, co-authored with Florian H.K. Theissen, is entitled: ‘The European Court of Human Rights on religious symbols in public institutions – a comparative perspective: maximum protection of the freedom of religion through judicial minimalism?’.

Order information:

http://www.ashgate.com/isbn/9781409411437.