Journalist Ben Judah, Author of This is London (2016): ‘I Found Faith Everywhere’

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According to the publisher, ‘This is London explodes fossilized myths and offers a fresh, exciting portrait of what it’s like to live, work, fall in love, raise children, grow old and die in London now’ (see more at: http://www.picador.com/books/this-is-london#sthash.ja63s8zF.dpuf). A Dutch translation of the book, entitled Dit is Londen, was published in January 2017.

In an article in The Big Issue (Feb. 16, 2016), author Ben Judah writes:

‘To my surprise, a hidden spirituality burst out. I never expected my quest for the city to reveal to me the immigrant mega-city’s prayers. Nigerian Peckham took me to a sacred seer, Russian Mayfair took me to its kabbalist, Pakistani Leyton told me of the love and secrets with which the faithful wash the dead.

At night London murmurs, a city of prayer. It is no longer haunted by Jack the Ripper but by the curses of Roma beggars and the amulets worn by Ghanaian witchdoctors. I found faith everywhere. The London of Karl Marx and empty pews is gone. Instead, a city of countless Nigerian street-preachers, Somali basement mosques and overflowing Polish churches. But the chapels of the other London are not like ours. London’s gods now live in converted bingo-halls and backrooms.’

The introduction of my new book contains the following passage: ‘To the extent that I had a particular location in mind while writing this book, it was New York City. At just a one-hour train ride away from Princeton, the “greatest city on earth” occasionally formed a welcome and highly inspirational escape from the sometimes rather too peaceful and quiet Princeton campus during the year in which I worked there. Obviously, New York City has its own fair share of problems and there is no reason to idealise life in the city, or in the United States for that matter, whatsoever. Still, to my mind, there is no better test case for social pluralist theory than this diverse place.’ The same goes for London.

This is the third post in a new series introducing my forthcoming book on Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom. To be Fully Human (Routledge, 2017).

For the first two posts, please see:

The Washington Post on Why Religious Freedom Could Become the Major Religion Story of 2017;

 

Book on Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom. To Be Fully Human (Routledge) now available for pre-order

Participant, Kuyper Center Annual Conference 2015 Pre-conference symposium ‘Faith in the Work Place’

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‘Does Christian faith have any impact in the workplace? Does it show in the way that people do their jobs? Should it be given more emphasis, or less? These are some of the questions to be addressed in the third Abraham Kuyper pre-conference symposium on April 15th and 16th 2015. This year, the Abraham Kuyper Center for Theology and Public Life is collaborating with two other organizations whose expertise in this area brings theory and practice into fruitful conversation. The ‘Faith and Work Initiative’ at Princeton University, led by Princeton Seminary graduate David Miller, investigates the ways in which the resources of various religious traditions and spiritual identities shape and inform engagement with diverse workplace issues. The Center for Faith and Work at Redeemer Presbyterian Church New York, headed by David Kim (also a Princeton Seminary graduate, who worked on Abraham Kuyper) seeks to equip individuals of all backgrounds to develop and apply a worldview for work that better serves their profession and industry. Staff from both organizations will make presentations aimed at opening up a wide-ranging discussion of an increasingly important theme for both church and industry.
The ‘Faith in the Workplace’ symposium is open, free of charge, both to participants in the annual Kuyper Conference that follows, and to all interested clergy and laity in the wider Princeton area, as well as students and faculty at Princeton Seminary. (…)
Wednesday 15th April
2pm Welcome and introduction
Dr Gordon Graham, Kuyper Center, PTS

2.15 – 4.45pm

Kuyper returns to NYC: Appropriating Kuyperian Theology to Empower the Scattered Church

Rev. David H. Kim and Bethany Jenkins
Center for Faith & Work
Redeemer Presbyterian Church, New York

Thursday 16th April
9.30am – 12noon

Faith & Work: Augustine, Maslow, Nixon, King, and Beyond

Dr David Miller, with Michael Thate and Dennis LoRusso
Faith and Work Initiative,
Center for the Study of Religion, Princeton University’

Source: http://www.ptsem.edu/library/kuyper/default.aspx?id=25769808845.

Participant, Conference ‘The Islamic State’s Religious Cleansing and the Urgency of a Strategic Response’, Hudson Institute, New York (May 7th, 2015)

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‘As military plans are being laid for an offensive to liberate Mosul, Iraq’s second largest city, from Islamic State militants, this conference focused on the policies and strategies urgently needed to help the Middle East’s vulnerable religious minorities.

Leading the discussion was Cardinal Timothy Dolan, Archbishop of New York, and Hudson Distinguished Scholar Walter Russell Mead. They were joined by experts from multiple pontifical humanitarian agencies, writers, and noted experts.

Nearly a year after the Islamic State swept through northern Iraq and enforced its convert-or-die ultimatum, tens of thousands of Iraqi Christians and members of other ancient religions remain in encampments in Kurdistan and neighboring countries. They subsist on international humanitarian aid and their children lack access to education. Many are losing hope of ever returning to their homes and, with few options to resettle within the region, many are seeking to leave.

Is there any hope that these Christians and other religious minorities can remain in the Middle East?’

About the Hudson Institute:

‘Founded in 1961 by strategist Herman Kahn, Hudson Institute challenges conventional thinking and helps manage strategic transitions to the future through interdisciplinary studies in defense, international relations, economics, health care, technology, culture, and law.

Hudson seeks to guide public policy makers and global leaders in government and business through a vigorous program of publications, conferences, policy briefings, and recommendations.’

For the program, a transcript of Cardinal Timothy Dolan’s seven point plan to end persecution of Christians, audio and video of this particular event, see:

http://www.hudson.org/events/1245-the-islamic-state-s-religious-cleansing-and-the-urgency-of-a-strategic-response52015.