Tag Archives: globalization

Upcoming meeting of the Tradition Project, Rome, December 12-13

I look forward to participating in the third session of the St. John’s Law School Center for Law and Religion’s Tradition Project, “The Value of Tradition in the Global Context,” in Rome this week.

‘December 12, 2018
9.00 – 13.00
LUMSA University – Jubilee Complex
Via di Porta Castello, 44 – Rome

LUMSA University is co-organizing and hosting two major international conferences in  November and December one dealing with fundamental rights and conflicts between rights, the other with the value of tradition in a globalised world.
The first, November 15-16, will discuss “Fundamental Rights and Conflicts Among Rights“. The second, to be held on December 12-13, The Value of Tradition in the Global Context will explore the tension  between tradition and globalisation, between identities, by their nature local, and global government, by its nature centralising. What are the understandings of tradition at the global level? How is the relationship between local traditions and global government to be construed? How does  tradition relate to liberalism, nationalism and populism? and to human rights? (…)

Keynote address: Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr., United States Supreme Court
Keynote respondents: Prof. Dr. Giuseppe Dalla Torre (President Vatican State Tribunal, Emerito LUMSA University), Hon. Prof. Ugo De Siervo (Presidente Emerito della Corte costituzionale italiana), Prof. Dr. Chantal Delsol (Emérite et Membre Académie des Sciences morales et politiques), Hon. Prof. Andrès Ollero (Tribunal Constitucional de España)

Moderator: Dr. R. R. Reno, First Things

Twenty scholars in law, politics, philosophy, from Europe and the USA will then discuss the themes in four workshops upon invitation.

Workshop participants: Prof. Pasquale Annicchino (European University Institute), Prof. Richard Garnett (University of Notre Dame), Prof. Eduardo Gianfrancesco (LUMSA University), Prof. John McGinnis (Northwestern University), Prof. Fabio Macioce (LUMSA University), Prof. Anna Moreland (Villanova University), Prof. Jide Nzelibe (Northwestern University), Prof. Andrea Pin (University of Padua), Prof. Emilia Powell (University of Notre Dame), Prof. Kristina Stoeckl (University of Innsbruck), Prof.  John Tasioulas (King’s College London), Prof. Hans-Martien Ten Napel (Leiden University), Prof. Marco Ventura (University of Siena, Fondazione Bruno Kessler di Trento), Prof. Adrian Vermeule (Harvard University)

Conference Conveners: Prof. Marc O. DeGirolami (St. John’s University), Prof. Monica Lugato (LUMSA University), Prof. Michael P.  Moreland (Villanova University), Prof. Mark L. Movsesian (St. John’s University)

REGISTRATION: eventi@lumsa.it, R.S.V.P. BY DECEMBER 7, 2018

Simultaneous translation will be provided.

The Programme
The Playbill’

Source: https://www.lumsa.it/en/value-tradition-global-context.

For a podcast on the topic with Center Director Mark Movsesian and Associate Director Marc DeGirolami, see:

Legal Spirits Episode 003: Tradition in the Global Context

Contribution to volume on Reshaping Protestantism in a Global Context (2009)

0706-1

‘The regional contributions from Africa and Asia show how the old European made denominational differences fade in the light of African Instituted Churches or Pentecostalism. Reshaping Protestantism is not a backward oriented project of reconstructing the original but makes use of the inner protestant pluralism to cope with globalization and changing religious landscapes. Who reads through the different articles can only come to the conclusion: Yes, there is a contribution to be expected from mainline Protestantism in all its variety.’

My own contribution to the volume is entitled ‘Protestantism, Globalization, and the Democratic Constitutional State’. You can download it here:

https://openaccess.leidenuniv.nl/handle/1887/15162.

The abstract reads as follows:

‘In this article I want to explore whether Calvinism has the potential to once again act as a force toward cultural liberty in today’s world, and if so, to what extent. Because religion is of profound importance to one’s identity, I will thereby focus on religious liberty. In paragraph two I will, first of all, indicate what the pluralist approach to constitutional democracy is about, that neo-Calvinists have developed during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Paragraphs three and four will then look at the prospects for this approach in the Netherlands, where it originated, and in other cultural contexts, respectively. I will round up with a conclusion in which I will refer to Alister E. McGrath’s thesis about the end of mainline Protestantism.

 

Order information of the volume as a whole:

http://www.lit-verlag.de/isbn/3-8258-0706-1;

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=Reshaping+Protestantism+in+a+Global+Context.