Acton University, June 20-23 2017, Grand Rapids, Michigan

Looking forward to participating in this year’s Acton University.

‘What is Acton University?

  • Four days that integrate sound economics, business, philosophy, theology, and intellectual history
  • A customized learning plan that you create: featuring over 120 courses taught by over 80 experts: an international, world class faculty
  • An exploration of the intellectual foundations of freedom, and respect for the dignity and value of the human person
  • A place to learn about the classical foundations of economics, philosophy, theology, liberty and how they apply to our culture today
  • A unique educational experience enabling you to lead with a greater understanding of the intersection of liberty and morality
  • An international, ecumenical network of attendees helping you to apply your knowledge in shaping culture towards a free and virtuous society’

Source, and more information, and registration: http://university.acton.org/about-au.

Acton University is organized by the Acton Institute, ‘a think-tank whose mission is to promote a free and virtuous society characterized by individual liberty and sustained by religious principles’. See https://acton.org.

Participant, expert seminar ‘Religious Pluralism and Human Rights in Europe: Where to Draw the Line?’, Netherlands Institute of Human Rights, Utrecht (9-10 May 2006)

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‘”How should we deal with religious pluralism in contemporary Europe from a human rights perspective and where should we draw the line, if any?” This was the central question of an expert seminar held in 2006 at Utrecht University to celebrate the inaugural address of Abdullahi An-Na’im, who occupied the G.J. Wiarda Chair at the Netherlands Institute of Human Rights (SIM) in 2005/2006. (…)
Though religious pluralism in itself is anything but new in Europe, the influx of large groups of non-Christians, especially Muslims, and the political climate after recent terrorist attacks have profoundly changed the terms of the debate on how to deal with it. Should all religions be treated the same, or is it legitimate to take European Christian heritage into account?
Does religion deserve more protection than culture? What does it mean if we say the State has to be secular and/or neutral? How should freedom of religion be dealt with if it conflicts with other fundamental rights such as sex equality? And how should one approach limitations on the freedom of expression that are related to religion, such as hate speech bans or criminalisation of glorifying terrorism?
The questions are set against the background of modern notions of citizenship and the European human rights framework.’

Source: http://intersentia.com/en/shop/academisch/religious-pluralism-and-human-rights-in-europe.html.

About the Netherlands Institute of Human Rights:

‘SIM is the key centre of expertise of human rights research and education at Utrecht University.

The Netherlands Institute of Human Rights offers internationally oriented study programmes, conducts interdisciplinary research and organises a range of activities in the field of human rights.

History
Established in 1981 as a research support institute for a group of Dutch human rights NGOs, SIM has become integrated into Utrecht University over time. SIM was one of the founders of the Netherlands School of Human Rights Research and is the home of the Netherlands Quarterly of Human Rights. Famous human rights researchers have headed SIM since its creation, including Hans Thoolen, Manfred Nowak, Peter Baehr, Cees Flinterman and Jenny Goldschmidt. Antoine Buyse is SIM’s current director. With a rich tradition and a keen eye voor current and future developments in the field of human rights, SIM is a leading academic research institute and the home base of a vibrant, interdisciplinary and international group of researchers, lecturers, and PhD students.’

– See more at: http://sim.rebo.uu.nl/en/over-ons/#sthash.Klf2stYo.dpuf.

Participant, Conference on Law and the Culture of Liberty, James Madison Program (May 18-19, 2015)

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This Robert J. Giuffra ’82 Conference was co-sponsored by The Association for the Study of Free Institutions, Texas Tech University and the Bouton Law Lecture Fund:

‘What is the relationship among law, culture, and human freedom? Is freedom to be found primarily where law is kept to a minimum and culture is therefore mostly the spontaneous reflection of the choices of largely autonomous individuals? Or does true freedom require law to provide a kind of moral discipline, a habituation in the virtues, with a view to promoting a culture in which freedom is directed toward the ourishing of our nature, and not just toward whatever may appear desirable to the individual? To what extent can law shape culture in this way, and to what extent is it rather shaped by a culture that already exists?

In order to foster re ection on these issues, the James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions and the Association for the Study of Free Institutions are pleased to announce a conference entitled “Law and the Culture of Liberty.” The program includes scholars from a variety of disciplines in the social sciences and humanities. We seek to address a number of questions. What is the proper relationship between law and liberty in the natural-law jurisprudence of John Finnis and his colleagues? To what extent does our ourishing according to nature require freedom from legal constraint, and to what extent does it require the discipline of legal sanctions? How does contemporary American popular culture shape our understanding of law and liberty? Is pop culture a powerful force for freedom, or does it undermine the virtues of character and mind necessary for the preservation of the free society? What is the role of marriage in fostering a culture of liberty? To what extent does a healthy marriage culture require the support of law? What is the role of freedom of thought and speech in maintaining a free and decent culture? Should law permit an untrammeled right of self-expression, or must it rather set limits on what may be said in order to protect civility and other important social values? Most fundamentally, can we attain rational knowledge of the true character of law, of culture, and of liberty, and of their proper relation to one another?’

For source, and conference schedule, see:

http://web.princeton.edu/sites/jmadison/calendar/documents/Program%202015%20051819%20May%20Conf.pdf.

About the James Madison Program:

‘Founded in the summer of 2000, the James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions in the Department of Politics at Princeton University is dedicated to exploring enduring questions of American constitutional law and Western political thought. The Program is also devoted to examining the application of basic legal and ethical principles to contemporary problems. To realize its mission, the James Madison Program implements a number of initiatives. The Program awards visiting fellowships and postdoctoral appointments each year to support scholars conducting research in the elds of constitutional law and political thought. The Program supports the James Madison Society, an international community of scholars, and promotes civic education by its sponsorship of conferences, lectures, seminars, and colloquia. The Program’s Undergraduate Fellows Forum provides opportunities for Princeton undergraduates to interact with Madison Program Fellows and speakers. The success of the James Madison Program depends on the support of foundations and private individuals who share its commitment in advancing the understanding and appreciation of American ideals and institutions.’

Participant, The Ninth Annual John F. Scarpa Conference on ‘Catholic Legal Theory: Aspirations, Challenges, and Hopes’, Villanova University School of Law (2015)

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‘The Ninth Annual John F. Scarpa Conference on Law, Politics, and Culture will explore the topic “Catholic Legal Theory: Aspirations, Challenges, and Hopes.” The symposium will take place on Friday, April 24, from 9:15 a.m. to 4:15 p.m., in Room 201 of the Law School. This program is approved by the Pennsylvania Continuing Legal Education Board for 5 CLE credits (4 substantive, 1 ethics). (…)

CONFERENCE AGENDA

Welcome and Introduction: 9:15 a.m.

Patrick McKinley Brennan, Professor of Law and John F. Scarpa Chair in Catholic Legal Studies, Villanova University School of Law

Session 1: 9:30-10:45 a.m.

Robert Vischer, Dean and Mengler Chair in Law, University of St. Thomas School of Law: “How Should Catholic Legal Theory Matter to Catholic Legal Eduction in a Time of Retrenchment?”

John Breen, Professor of Law, Loyola University Chicago School of Law: “Catholic Legal Theory in Catholic Law Schools: Past and Present”

Elizabeth Schiltz, Professor, Thomas J. Abood Research Scholar, and Co-Director of the Terrence J. Murphy Institute for Catholic Thought, Law and Public Policy, University of St. Thomas School of Law: “‘You Talkin’ to Me?’ Who Are We Talking to? And Why Should They Listen to Us?”

Break

Session 2: 11:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

Michael A. Scaperlanda, Professor of Law and Gene and Elaine Edwards Family Chair in Law, The University of Oklahoma College of Law: “Challenging the Common Assumptions regarding Liberty”

Michael Moreland, Vice Dean and Professor of Law, Villanova University School of Law: “Pope Francis and the Project of Catholic Legal Theory”

Patrick McKinley Brennan: “Problematics of Catholic Legal Theory under the Roman Regime of Novelty (since 1965 or so)”

Lunch

Session 3: 1:15-2:45 p.m.

Thomas C. Berg, James L. Oberstar Professor of Law and Public Policy, University of St. Thomas School of Law: “The Relevance and Irrelevance of the Reformation to the Catholic Legal Theory Project”

Marc O. DeGirolami, Associate Professor of Law & Associate Dean for Faculty Scholarship, St. John’s University School of Law: “Tradition and Catholic Legal Theory”

Susan Stabile, Professor of Law and Faculty Fellow for Spiritual Life, University of St. Thomas School of Law: “Evangelii Gaudium and Catholic Legal Theory”

Kevin C. Walsh, Associate Professor of Law, University of Richmond School of Law: “Marius Victorinus at MOJ”

Break

Roundtable: 3:00-4:15 p.m.
The Catholic Legal Theory Project: Concepts and Goals

The annual Conference on Law, Politics, and Culture is named for John F. Scarpa, in recognition of his generous support of Villanova University School of Law through the John F. Scarpa Chair in Catholic Legal Studies.’

Source: https://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/law/newsroom/webstories/2015/0325.html.

About Villanova University:

‘Villanova University is a Roman Catholic institution of higher learning founded by the Order of Saint Augustine in 1842. Villanova provides a comprehensive education rooted in the liberal arts; a shared commitment to the Augustinian ideals of truth, unity and love; and a community dedicated to service to others.’