Presenter and Discussant, ICON-S Conference ‘Courts, Power, Public Law’, University of Copenhagen, 5-7 July 2017 (II)

Just two out of many panels, which made this yet another great conference. Proud to have been part of it for the fourth year in a row, after Florence, New York City and Berlin.

Ernst-Wolfgang Böckenförde’s Constitutional Thought in Comparative Perspective

Participants: Tine Stein, Mirjam Künkler Sabino Cassese, Kai Möller, Michaela Hailbronner, Alexander Somek

‘Ernst-Wolfgang Böckenförde (born 1930) is one of Germany’s foremost legal scholars and political thinkers. As a scholar of constitutional law, Böckenförde has been a major contributor to the conceptual framework of the modern state, and to political and ethical controversies from vexed questions about potential states of emergency to the ethics of genetic engineering. As a judge on Germany’s Federal Constitutional Court (1983 – 1996) and the author of the highest number of dissenting opinions in the court’s history, Böckenförde has significantly influenced the way law and politics are conceived of in Germany. This panel revisits Böckenförde’s work as a late beacon of the German statist tradition and probes its relevance amid contemporary debates about the constitutional implications of a globalized world order, where notions of a post-state, post-sovereign, and multi-level ordering, have taken center stage. Böckenförde is unique in that he confronts the basic concepts and conceptual presuppositions of the old Staatslehre with the challenges of an interdependent world. Focusing on his notions of the state and of the constitution, participants explore the timeliness of Böckenförde’s work and ask whether and to what extent it can serve as a basis for a European public law.’

Searching for the Constitutional Identity within EU: Beyond Courts’ Interpretation

Participants: Tímea Drinóczi, Giacomo Delledonne, Pietro Faraguna, Marco Bassini, Neliana Rodean

‘In the recent time identity of the constitutional order has become a challenged topic within the European space both in respect of its subjective sense of selfness of a member state vis-á-vis others and regarding the construction of a European Constitutional identity. The panel invites scholars to discuss the ambivalent meaning of constitutional identity focusing, firstly, on how European constitutional identity relates to the specific constitutional identities of European nation-states and the implications for the division of authority between the European and national levels within the EU. Secondly, the panel offers the opportunity to discover to what extend the constitutional identity became the explicit arena of disputes between Courts, and how its definition goes beyond their interpretation.’

See also:

Presenter and Discussant, ICON-S Conference ‘Courts, Power, Public Law’, University of Copenhagen, 5-7 July 2017

Participant, 2016 ICON∙S Conference on ‘Borders, Otherness and Public Law’

Paper presentation on ‘The Modern Challenges of Democracy’, New York University School of Law

Paper-presentation ‘Imaginations From the Other Side. Assessing the Juncture between Law, History and Sociology in the Study of State-Religion Interlocutions’

Press Release: ‘Twelve ILS seed money grants for frontier research at Leiden Law School’

Press Release: ‘Twelve ILS seed money grants for frontier research at Leiden Law School’

‘Twelve researchers of our Law School have been awarded an ILS seed money grant. This grant enables researchers to create space for preparing a grant proposal for NWO, ERC or otherwise.

Given the impressive quality of the twelve applications received in response to the ILS seed money call, the Research Board advised to find ways to support all the applications. The Faculty Board has invested additional funds to make this possible. Each researcher that has received a grant has committed her- or himself to submitting a grant proposal and to publish at least one article on the research theme.

An overview of the grant writers and their research themes is provided in the table below. (…)

For more information on the research focus area Interaction between Legal Systems visit our website.

Applicant Research theme
Boom, W.H. van Litigation strategy and third party funder involvement
De Brabandere, E. The dynamics of arbitration institutions in investment treaty arbitration
Cuyvers, A. Beyond Brexit: New models of EU membership for a flexible and viable Union of 27
Dam-de Jong D.A. From war to peace: the contribution of international law to enhancing compliance with intra-state peace agreements
Jesse, M. Who ‘we’ really are and who ‘we’ want to be – Europe’s Reaction to the Refugee Crises: the envisioned project will look at legislative changes after the refugee crises to decipher underlying ideals and principles governing our societies
Kunst, M.J.J. Unlocking the international evidence base of “victim-oriented” legislation: A systematic and critical review of the literature
Leijten, I. Social rights cities
Liefaard, T. Access to justice for children: Understanding the concept and its significance for the effective protection of children’s rights in a pluralist world
Napel, H.M.T.D. ten Constitutional identity in a ‘Post-Truth, Post-West, Post-Order’ Era.
Ouwerkerk, J. What price EU defence rights? Exploring the need for a different division of costs in EU criminal justice cooperation
Rose, C.E. How transnational criminal law treaties influence the behaviour of states, in particular those treaties concerning corruption, organised crime, and terrorist financing
Sentse, M. Sociale netwerken binnen detentie: Correlaties en consequenties van de aard en mate van sociale contacten tussen gedetineerden

Source: Twelve ILS seed money grants for frontier research at Leiden Law School