Presentation during Second National Conference of Christians in Political Science, Calvin College, Grand Rapids, MI (1999)

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About the Conference:

‘The Paul Henry Institute will host the second national conference of Christians in Political Science, June 17-20, 1999. Christian political scientists from the United States, Canada, the Netherlands, and Australia have already registered to attend the event. More than twenty different panels, each addressing different thematic issues, have been organized, with more than sixty papers being given by different scholars in the field. On Friday, June 18, the Rev. Richard John Neuhaus will deliver an address that will be open to the public.’

Source: http://henry.calvin.edu/dotAsset/182cb684-4848-4d40-8150-9476e78b335d.pdf.

About the Henry Institute:

‘The Paul B. Henry Institute for the Study of Christianity and Politics was created in 1997 to continue the work of integrating Christian faith and politics advanced by its namesake, educator and public servant Paul B. Henry.

The Institute is dedicated to providing resources for scholarship, encouraging citizen involvement and education, structuring opportunities to disseminate scholarly work, seeking avenues to communicate and promote information about Christianity and public life to the broader public, and motivating and training future scholars and leaders.’

About Christians in Political Science:

‘Christians in Political Science aims to encourage students of politics to integrate their Christian faith into their research and writing; stimulate and assist members to bring insights and perspectives from their faith to classroom teaching; and provide a forum for fellowship. We recognize that Christians of good faith may disagree about how Christianity should inform our professional, political, and other activities. Indeed, a major goal of CPS is to encourage discussion of these matters among believers from different traditions and with divergent views.’

My own presentation was entitled ‘The Fall of Christian Democracy in Europe’.

Presentation during day conference on ‘Multiculturalism: Template for Peace or Recipe for Division’, West Yorkshire School of Christian Studies, Leeds (2007)

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‘”Has multiculturalism had its day?” “Has multicultural society any space for faith-based institutions”? This time the answers come from Greg Mulholland MP, Jan van der Stoep, Hans-Martien ten Napel and Jonathan Chaplin, who are the speakers at a day conference run by the West Yorkshire School of Christian Studies.

Multiculturalism: Template for peace or recipe for conflict? takes place on December 8 at Outwood House, Horsforth with sessions at Woodside Methodist Church.’

Source: ThirdWay Magazine, december 2007.

‘WYSOCS is a Christian education centre exploring the power of faith in learning for every aspect of life. Based in Leeds, we provide resources for Christians throughout the UK and beyond to engage culture with an authentically Christian worldview.’ See: http://wysocs.org.uk.

You can download Jonathan Chaplin’s contribution, ‘Has multiculturalism had its day? Towards a Christian assessment’, here: http://www.klice.co.uk/uploads/Ethics%20in%20Brief/Chaplin%20v12.6%20pub.pdf.

For audio, go here: http://www.wysocs.org.uk/recordings.php.

My own presentation was entitled: ‘”Curbing’ multiculturalism in the European Court of Human Rights?

 

Chapter in volume on Religion, Politics and Law. Philosophical Reflections on the Sources of Normative Order in Society (2009)

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‘Modern, liberal democracies in the West living under the rule of law and protection of human rights cannot articulate the very values from which they derive their legitimacy. These pre-political and pre-legal preconditions cannot be guaranteed, let alone be enforced by the state, but constitute nevertheless its moral and spiritual infrastructure. Until recently, a common background and horizon consisted in Christianity, but due to secularisation and globalisation, society has become increasingly multicultural and multireligious. The question can and should be raised how religion relates to these sources of normative order in society, how religion, politics and law relate to each other, and how social cohesion can be attained in society, given the growing varieties of religious experiences. In this book, a philosophical account of this question is carried out, on the one hand historically from Plato to the Enlightenment, on the other hand systematically and practically.’

My own chapter, co-authored with Florian H. Karim Theissen, is entitled ‘Taking Pluralism Seriously: The US and the EU as Multicultural Democracies’.

See https://www.researchgate.net/publication/228283908_Taking_Pluralism_Seriously_The_US_and_the_EU_as_Multicultural_Democracies.

For order information, visit http://www.brill.com/religion-politics-and-law;

or http://www.amazon.com/Religion-Politics-Law-Bart-Labuschagne/dp/9004172076/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1452689366&sr=8-1&keywords=religion%2C+politics%2C+law+labuschagne.