Law and Religious Freedom Book Panel at the Annual Meetings of the American Academy of Religion and the Society of Biblical Literature, Boston, Friday, November 17, 2017, 4 PM – 6 PM EST (II)

About the three distinguished panelists:

Professor Cathleen Kaveny, a scholar who focuses on the relationship of law, religion, and morality, joined the Boston College faculty in January 2014 as the Darald and Juliet Libby Professor, a position that includes appointments in both the department of theology and the law school. She is the first faculty member to hold such a joint appointment. A member of the Massachusetts Bar since 1993, Professor Kaveny clerked for the Honorable John T. Noonan Jr. of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit and worked as an associate at the Boston law firm of Ropes & Gray in its health-law group.

Professor Kaveny has published over a hundred articles and essays, in journals and books specializing in law, ethics, and medical ethics. She serves on the masthead of Commonweal as a regular columnist. Her book, Law’s Virtues: Fostering Autonomy and Solidarity in American Society, was published by Georgetown University Press in 2012. It won a first place award in the category of “Faithful Citizenship” from the Catholic Press Association. She is currently completing a book entitled Prophecy without Contempt: An Ethics of Religious Rhetoric in the Public Square.

Professor Kaveny regularly teaches contract law to first-year law students. She also teaches a number of seminars which explore the relationship between theology, philosophy, and law, such as “Faith, Morality, and Law,” “Mercy and Justice,” and “Complicity.”

Professor Kaveny is the president of the Society of Christian Ethics, the major professional society for scholars of Christian ethics and moral theology in North America. It meets annually in conjunction with the Society of Jewish Ethics and the Society for the Study of Muslim Ethics.

Professor Kaveny has served on a number of editorial boards including The American Journal of Jurisprudence, The Journal of Religious Ethics, the Journal of Law and Religion, and The Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics. She has been a visiting professor at Princeton University, Yale University and Georgetown University, and a visiting scholar at the University of Chicago’s Martin Marty Center. From 1995 until 2013 she taught law and theology at the University of Notre Dame, where she was a John P. Murphy Foundation Professor of Law.’

Source: https://www.bc.edu/bc-web/schools/law/academics-faculty/faculty-directory/cathleen-kaveny.html

Shaun Casey is director of the Berkley Center and a professor of the practice in Georgetown’s Walsh School of Foreign Service. He previously was U.S. special representative for religion and global affairs and director of the U.S. Department of State’s Office of Religion and Global Affairs. He has also held positions at Wesley Theological Seminary in Washington, D.C., the Center for American Progress, and the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Casey has written on the ethics of the war in Iraq, as well the role of religion in American presidential politics. He is the author of The Making of a Catholic President: Kennedy vs. Nixon 1960 (2009) and co-editor of The Oxford Handbook of Political Theology (forthcoming, with Michael Kessler); he is writing a book on ethics and international politics tentatively titled Niebuhr’s Children. Casey holds a B.A. from Abilene Christian University, MPA from Harvard Kennedy School, and M.Div. and Th.D. in religion and society from Harvard Divinity School.’

Source: https://berkleycenter.georgetown.edu/people/shaun-casey

Robin W. Lovin is William H. Scheide Senior Fellow at the Center of Theological Inquiry in Princeton, New Jersey, and Cary Maguire University Professor of Ethics emeritus at Southern Methodist University.  A resident scholar at CTI since 2012, he became a member of the SMU faculty in 1994, and served as Dean of SMU’s Perkins School of Theology from 1994-2002. Dr. Lovin’s most recent books are Christian Realism and the New Realities (2008) and An Introduction to Christian Ethics (2011). He has also written extensively on religion and law and comparative religious ethics. He is a former Guggenheim Fellow, former president of the Society of Christian Ethics, and a member of the advisory board for the McDonald Centre for Theology, Ethics, and Public Life at Oxford University.’

Source: http://www.ctinquiry.org/program/bio_robin-lovin

See also:

Law and Religious Freedom Book Panel at the Annual Meetings of the American Academy of Religion and the Society of Biblical Literature, Boston, Friday, November 17 at 4 PM – 6 PM EST

Paper presentation during panel on ‘Religion & Pluralism in a Changing World’, BYU Law School, Provo, Utah

Book review: ‘The Political Theology of European Integration,’ by Mark R. Royce

 

 

 

Law and Religious Freedom Book Panel at the Annual Meetings of the American Academy of Religion and the Society of Biblical Literature, Boston, Friday, November 17 at 4 PM – 6 PM EST

‘CTI will hold a new session at AAR/SBL – Fresh Thinking from the Center of Theological Inquiry

Friday – 4:00 PM-6:00 PM
Location: Sheraton Boston-Clarendon (Third Level)

First Session
4:00 pm to 4:50 pm – Session 1: Astrobiology, Religion, & Society
Frederick Simmons, Center of Theological Inquiry
“From Land Ethics to Life as a Planetary Phenomenon”
Responding: Lisa Sideris, Indiana University

Second Session
5:00 pm to 6:00 pm – Session 2: Law and Religious Freedom Book Panel discussing two new books written at CTI by members in the Inquiry on Law and Religious Freedom (2014-2015). Conversation will include the authors as well as invited respondents.

John P. Burgess, Pittsburgh Theological Seminary
Holy Rus’: The Rebirth of Orthodoxy in the New Russia (Yale University Press, 2017)

Hans-Martien ten Napel, Leiden University
Constitutionalism, Democracy, and Religious Freedom: To Be Fully Human (Routledge, 2017)’

Source: Facebook

See also:

Press Release: ‘Hans-Martien ten Napel has book published “Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom. To Be Fully Human”’

Interview on project on ‘Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom’

Research Fellowship at Princeton University

 

Colloquium Geloof in democratie

‘Congres/symposium

Geloof in democratie

Datum
30 oktober 2017
Tijd
13:00 – 17:00  uur
Bezoekadres
Oude Sterrewacht
Sterrenwachtlaan 11
2311 GW Leiden
Zaal
C104

Een nieuw onderzoeksnetwerk

Veel meer dan het democratische systeem, neigen totalitaire regimes tot een zogenaamde ‘politieke religie’. Een politieke religiositeit die ons bekend is van de Franse Revolutie, het fascisme in Duitsland en Noord-Korea.

Dit verschil mag echter niet blind maken voor een fundamentele overeenkomstigheid. Schijnbaar heeft ook de democratie dergelijke totalitaire kenmerken en lijkt ook zij geneigd tot een zekere zichzelf compromitterende religiositeit. Een zekere politieke religie lijkt het product van democratie te zijn. Deze religie dreigt haar te ondergraven en in potentie zelfs te elimineren.

Het nieuwe netwerk ‘Geloof in democratie’ (GID) wil deze verschijnselen analyseren en kritisch onderzoeken. Tevens zoekt het naar de geestelijke grondslagen van een nieuwe legitimiteit: een ander democratisch geloof.

Startbijeenkomst

Op 30 oktober wordt het netwerk ten doop gehouden met een colloquium, georganiseerd rondom een drietal lezingen over het thema Geloof in democratie, waarop door enkele respondenten kort zal worden gereageerd.

De lezingen worden verzorgd door Carinne Elion-Valter (EUR), Timo Slootweg (UL) en Hans-Martien ten Napel (UL), naar aanleiding van hun recente boekpublicaties.

De lezingen zullen worden gevolgd door een dialoog tussen sprekers, respondenten en het publiek. Deze dialoog zal mede gericht zijn op het verzamelen van bouwstenen voor een in september 2018 te organiseren symposium rondom GID.

Tijdens het colloquium kunnen zij die geïnteresseerd zijn hieraan mee te werken, alvast kennismaken en hun ideeën uitwisselen.

Oproep

Met het bovenstaande in gedachten, roepen de organisatoren onderzoekers met belangstelling op om zich aan te sluiten bij ons netwerk en om aanwezig te zijn bij het colloquium. Daarnaast nodigen wij hen uit om een paper proposal in te dienen voor de eerste gezamenlijke publicatie van ‘Geloof in democratie’.

De call for proposals is te vinden op de website van dit nieuwe netwerk: www.geloofindemocratie.nl.

Projectwebsite

POLITIEKE LEGITIMITEIT

Bron: Congres/symposium Geloof in democratie

Zie ook:

Book Recommendations (I): Nicholas Wolterstorff, Understanding Liberal Democracy (2012)

Press Release: ‘Hans-Martien ten Napel has book published “Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom. To Be Fully Human”’

Paper presentation on ‘The Modern Challenges of Democracy’, New York University School of Law

Paper presentation during panel on ‘Religion & Pluralism in a Changing World’, BYU Law School, Provo, Utah

From October 1-3, 2017, the 24th Annual International Law and Religion Symposium was held at Brigham Young University Law School in Provo, Utah, USA. The Symposium was attended by 100 participants, from 50 different countries, while interpretation at the venue was available in 11 languages (Arabic, French, Italian, Korean, Laotian, Mongolian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Ukrainian, and Vietnamese).

During the Symposium I had the honor of presenting a paper during the panel on ‘Religion & Pluralism in a Changing World’, and to find my recent book on Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom. To Be Fully Human exhibited on the book table.

During the final session of the Symposium my book was generously presented by Prof. Brett G. Scharffs, Director of the International Center for Law and Religion Studies, as one of several new ‘Books of Note’.

Before the official start of the conference, delegates attended a session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Salt Lake City, and heard the Mormon Tabernacle Choir perform their weekly broadcast Music and the Spoken Word.

See for more information about the Symposium:

Upcoming Speaking Engagement: 24th Annual International Law and Religion Symposium, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, 1-4 October 2017

See also:

Twelve posts introducing my new book on Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom. To Be Fully Human

Press Release: ‘Hans-Martien ten Napel has book published “Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom. To Be Fully Human”’

Visit Amazon’s Hans-Martien ten Napel Page

Upcoming Speaking Engagement: 24th Annual International Law and Religion Symposium, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, 1-4 October 2017

 

‘The International Center for Law and Religion Studies (ICLRS) is honored to announce the distinguished keynote speaker for the 24th Annual International Law and Religion Symposium — “Religion and Religious Freedom in a Changing World” — to be held 1-4 October 2017 at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah. András Sajó, Hungarian scholar and former Judge of the European Court of Human Rights, and Ján Figeľ, the European Commission’s Special Envoy for promotion of freedom of religion or belief outside the European Union, will speak at the opening session of the Symposium, to be held on Sunday evening, October 1, in the Moot Court Room (303) of the J. Reuben Clark Law School.

The opening session will be streamed live, beginning at 7 pm MST (UTC-7), to listeners worldwide. Interpretation at the venue will be available in 11 languages: Arabic, French, Italian, Korean, Laotian, Mongolian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Ukrainian, and Vietnamese.

Please note that, due to space limitations, the Symposium is open to invited participants only. However, all plenary sessions and other sessions held in Room 303 JRCB will be streamed live, and audio and video recordings of other sessions will be available soon after the event on the Center’s website and on YouTube.  (See recordings from Symposium 2016 here.)’

Source, and more information:

Symposium 2017: “Religion and Religious Freedom in a Changing World”

See also:

Press Release: ‘Hans-Martien ten Napel has book published “Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom. To Be Fully Human”’

Public Lecture by Professor Brett Scharffs on ‘Why Religious Freedom’, April 7, 15.00h, Free University, Amsterdam

Article ‘This Map Of The State Of Religious Freedom Around The World Is Chilling’

 

Participant, ‘The Quest for Legitimacy: Actors, Audiences and Aspirations’, 2017 APSA Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA, August 31-September 3 (II)

Three personal highlights of this year’s meeting of the American Political Science Association were:

Thursday:

David Azerrad (The Heritage Foundation), Carson L. Holloway (University of Nebraska, Omaha), Michael M. Uhlmann (Claremont Graduate University), and Christopher Wolfe (University of Dallas), discussing: ‘American Public Philosophy in the Age of Trump’.

Friday:

Peter R.W. Cross (Hillsdale College), Justin B. Dyer (University of Missouri, Columbia), Douglas Kries (Gonzaga University), Adam Seagrave (University of Missouri, Columbia), and Lee Ward (Baylor University) (picture), panel: ‘On the Compatibility of Natural Law and Natural Rights’.

Saturday:

Darren Patrick Guerra (Biola University), Amy E. Black (Wheaton College), Kevin R. Den Dulk (Calvin College) (picture), and J. Christopher Soper (Pepperdine University), panel: ‘Honoring Stephen Monsma: His Life and Work’.

Top picture: booth reception Routledge, publisher of Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom. To Be Fully Human (2017).

See also:

Participant, ‘The Quest for Legitimacy: Actors, Audiences and Aspirations’, 2017 APSA Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA, August 31-September 3 (I).

 

 

Participant, ‘The Quest for Legitimacy: Actors, Audiences and Aspirations’, 2017 APSA Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA, August 31-September 3 (I)

Topics include:

  • New Perspectives on Montesquieu
  • The Crisis of Constitutional Democracy
  • American Public Philosophy in the Age of Trump
  • On the Compatibility of Natural Law and Natural Rights
  • Author Meets Critics: Alexander Tsesis’s “Constitutional Ethos”
  • Liberalism in Crisis
  • Challenges to the Rule of Law
  • The Future of Conservatism
  • Constitution Making in Religiously Divided Societies

See for more information about the program: http://web.apsanet.org/apsa2017/.

See also:

Press Release: ‘Twelve ILS seed money grants for frontier research at Leiden Law School’

Participant, ‘Great Transformations: Political Science and the Big Questions of Our Time’, 2016 APSA Annual Meeting, Philadelphia, PA, September 1-4

Book review: ‘The Political Theology of European Integration,’ by Mark R. Royce

‘The central question political scientist Mark R. Royce addresses in his book, The Political Theology of European Integration: Comparing the Influence of Religious Histories on European Policies, is whether the process of European integration as it has developed since the Second World War, and continues to develop as a result of issues such as Brexit, is also influenced by political theological considerations. He defines “political theology” as “the authoritative application of sacred ideas to public policies and discourses” (p. 1). In the context of Royce’s study, which focuses on 17 Western European countries, in particular Roman Catholicism and the Lutheran, Calvinist, and Anglican forms of Protestantism are relevant.’

Read the whole book review, published on the Religion & Liberty Transatlantic Blog, here:   https://acton.org/publications/transatlantic/2017/08/18/book-review-political-theology-european-integration-mark-r

Presenter and Discussant, ICON-S Conference ‘Courts, Power, Public Law’, University of Copenhagen, 5-7 July 2017 (II)

Just two out of many panels, which made this yet another great conference. Proud to have been part of it for the fourth year in a row, after Florence, New York City and Berlin.

Ernst-Wolfgang Böckenförde’s Constitutional Thought in Comparative Perspective

Participants: Tine Stein, Mirjam Künkler Sabino Cassese, Kai Möller, Michaela Hailbronner, Alexander Somek

‘Ernst-Wolfgang Böckenförde (born 1930) is one of Germany’s foremost legal scholars and political thinkers. As a scholar of constitutional law, Böckenförde has been a major contributor to the conceptual framework of the modern state, and to political and ethical controversies from vexed questions about potential states of emergency to the ethics of genetic engineering. As a judge on Germany’s Federal Constitutional Court (1983 – 1996) and the author of the highest number of dissenting opinions in the court’s history, Böckenförde has significantly influenced the way law and politics are conceived of in Germany. This panel revisits Böckenförde’s work as a late beacon of the German statist tradition and probes its relevance amid contemporary debates about the constitutional implications of a globalized world order, where notions of a post-state, post-sovereign, and multi-level ordering, have taken center stage. Böckenförde is unique in that he confronts the basic concepts and conceptual presuppositions of the old Staatslehre with the challenges of an interdependent world. Focusing on his notions of the state and of the constitution, participants explore the timeliness of Böckenförde’s work and ask whether and to what extent it can serve as a basis for a European public law.’

Searching for the Constitutional Identity within EU: Beyond Courts’ Interpretation

Participants: Tímea Drinóczi, Giacomo Delledonne, Pietro Faraguna, Marco Bassini, Neliana Rodean

‘In the recent time identity of the constitutional order has become a challenged topic within the European space both in respect of its subjective sense of selfness of a member state vis-á-vis others and regarding the construction of a European Constitutional identity. The panel invites scholars to discuss the ambivalent meaning of constitutional identity focusing, firstly, on how European constitutional identity relates to the specific constitutional identities of European nation-states and the implications for the division of authority between the European and national levels within the EU. Secondly, the panel offers the opportunity to discover to what extend the constitutional identity became the explicit arena of disputes between Courts, and how its definition goes beyond their interpretation.’

See also:

Presenter and Discussant, ICON-S Conference ‘Courts, Power, Public Law’, University of Copenhagen, 5-7 July 2017

Participant, 2016 ICON∙S Conference on ‘Borders, Otherness and Public Law’

Paper presentation on ‘The Modern Challenges of Democracy’, New York University School of Law

Paper-presentation ‘Imaginations From the Other Side. Assessing the Juncture between Law, History and Sociology in the Study of State-Religion Interlocutions’

Press Release: ‘Twelve ILS seed money grants for frontier research at Leiden Law School’

Presenter and Discussant, ICON-S Conference ‘Courts, Power, Public Law’, University of Copenhagen, 5-7 July 2017

Looking forward to presenting next week on ‘The European Court of Human Rights’ “constitutional morality” in the religious domain’. The paper forms part of a panel on ‘Judicialisation of Human Rights Law and Policy: A Vehicle for Effective Protection of Fundamental Rights?’

The description of this panel reads as follows:

‘The panel introduces the Leiden Research Group ‘Effective Protection of Fundamental Rights in a Pluralist World’. Though judicialisation is in itself not a new phenomenon, in the context of today’s globalizing world and the increasing interaction between legal systems, judicialisation is taking on entirely new dimensions and is giving rise to new and complex issues. This is especially true in the field of fundamental rights. At first sight, this judicialisation in the area of human rights seems to be a positive development that furthers the effective protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms at the international regional and domestic level. However, judicialisation also raises a number of issues that need to be addressed, such as the democratic basis of law-making and separation of powers. Against this background, judicialisation as a means to further fundamental rights protection is very much in need of new and innovative research concerning its meaning workings and impact. Three elements merit particular attention during the panel: a.Conceptualization of judicialisation in the area of human rights; b.Judicialisation in relation to substantive areas of human rights; c.Potential and limitations of judicialisation for the effective protection of fundamental rights.’

My second paper presentation in Copenhagen is titled ‘In Defense of the Classical Liberal Conception Regarding Religious Freedom’, and will take place during a panel on ‘The Separation of Civil and Religious Powers’.

You can read the abstract of the paper here:

‘Leading U.S. scholar of constitutional interpretation Michael Paulsen has developed an interesting theory of religious freedom called ‘The Priority of God’. Paulsen distinguishes, first of all, a liberal conception of religious freedom, according to which it is widely assumed that religious truth exists in a society and the state is tolerant towards the various faith and other traditions. The U.S. however, has developed in the direction of a modern conception of religious freedom, which no longer recognises religious truth although the state remains tolerant. Moreover, still according to Paulsen, several European countries have adopted a postmodern conception of religious freedom. This conception does not just no longer recognise religious truth, but also implies a considerably less tolerant state as secularism becomes the established ‘religion’. This view paradoxically resembles the preliberal stance of religious intolerance out of the conviction that religious truth exists. In response to such developments and in light of the meeting’s general theme with special attention to the role of courts in achieving this, the proposed paper will make a case for the classical liberal position with respect to religious freedom. In light of the current religious diversity in society, this position still appears to be most conducive to safeguarding the position of religious minorities in public life in the increasingly secular, majoritarian contexts of Western liberal democracies.’

Finally, I will serve as discussant for Mathew John’s paper on ‘Framing Religion in Constitutional Power: A View from Indian Constitutional Law’ during the latter panel. Mathew John received his Ph.D. at the London School of Economics and Political Science in 2012. Since that year he has been working as an Associate Professor at the Jindal Global Law School Sonipat. Since January 2017 Ph.D. Mathew John is Fellow at the Käte Hamburger Center for Advanced Study in the Humanities ‘Law as Culture’.

For the full program of the ICON-S Conference, see: https://icon-society.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/ICON-S-Conference-2017-Programme.pdf.

See also:

Upcoming Speaking Engagement: 2017 ICON∙S Conference on ‘Courts, Power, and Public Law’, Copenhagen, July 5-7;

Press Release: ‘Hans-Martien ten Napel has book published “Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom. To Be Fully Human”’.